iJAMMING! is a music and lifestyle web site hosted by
author, journalist and dee jay Tony Fletcher.
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OUT NOW THROUGH OMNIBUS PRESS

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT HEDONISM AND TO READ EXCERPTS, CLICK HERE

ORDER THROUGH AMAZON.CO.UK

Tony Fletcher's next DJ appearances:

Friday August 1: STEP ON, The Royale, 506 Fifth Avenue, Park Slope, Brooklyn, between 12th/13th Street. With Jon Davies. Free admission (over 21). A night of all your favorite baggy, indie pop, Chicago house, punk-funk and northern soul classics.

THURSDAY JULY 24

HOLIDAY POSTCARD

Dear Readers,

Been too busy enjoying the beautiful English countryside – and, happily enough, the lovely summer weather – to write to you until now. Spent last weekend in the Suffolk coastal village of Southwold, which I must have described as "the quintessential English town" on at least a dozen occasions, either in the pub with Lord Nelson's original correspondence on the wall, at the hotel restaurant with its winning wine list, or on the newly refurbished pier which includes a museum of English piers. Still can't believe I went swimming in the North Sea on a Sunday morning and found the temperature comparable to the Atlantic off of New York or Jersey – and the oceancalmer with it.

The last few days, meanwhile, have been spent in the equally classic, if somewhat more metropolitan, Yorkshire town of Beverley – the first occasion on which three generations of Fletchers have been here together. Had the pleasure of pointing out my birthplace to my own son today and at the time of writing have just enjoyed a serene late-night walk around the town: at one point I had the 1000-year old Minster towering over me in all its floodlit glory on the left side of the road; three cows happily grazing in the grass in a pasture on my very right, so close I could have stroked them if I'd thought they'd appreciate it; and directly ahead of me, a pub that's been pouring beers under the same name since before The Mayflower sailed to the USA.

Reasons to be Cheerful: Punch and Judy by the Southwold Pier; Real Ale at a 450-year old pub in Beverley

Which brings me to a point I want to share, and it's something of a personal one, so I hope you'll indulge my ramble. I did a handful of interviews for the publication of Hedonism last week, in the process of which it was suggested to me - a couple of times in fact - that I was considered an unlikely candidate to have left London/England/Britain behind some 15 years ago, and equally unlikely to have set about writing a novel, let alone a novel like Hedonism. Leaving aside how all this implies that there are people outside my family who actually give a damn about me, the assertion essentially reinforces (one of) the reasons I left the UK in the first place…

…Even in the late 1980s, my reputation in the UK seemed to be permanently based on my track record with Jamming! Magazine (despite the fact it folded in January 1986) and my association with The Jam's front man (which had ended in January 1983), and nothing else I said or did – like writing a book on Echo and the Bunnymen, or managing a band – seemed like it was going to change that. By moving to New York, for all the genuine hardships that entailed, I was forced to start anew, whereby I discovered that, without the legacy/baggage of Jamming! (which meant little in the New World), I was capable of being so much more than a typecast music journalist. Nobody in the States questioned my right to become a club DJ, to embrace the techno-rave scene when it started in that country, or to set about writing vivid first-person memoir stories or explicit fiction. If anything, it was a surprise to many acquaintances in the States when I embarked on the Keith Moon biography (a project which, of course, took me back to the UK physically and emotionally and re-immersed me into the milieu from which I first emerged), yet nobody in my new home nation questioned my right to take on that project either.

And so, if there's one salient difference I've come to appreciate between the two countries, it's that America is a land of boundless potential for anyone willing to embrace its ambitious spirit, and that Britain is essentially a conservative country in which change is welcomed incrementally, if at all. I love that there are towns in Britain – like Southwold and Beverley – which are steeped in history and bask in tradition. I love that in London I can still run into the same old faces in the same old places – and that they're still involved in the same scenes as they were back then. But I also love that I seized a chance to live somewhere other than the UK, a place where my only limits have been my own ambitions, a place from where I was able to push myself, to prove myself, possibly even to find myself.

I'm not suggesting that the route I took is the 'right' one – I've seen people gain just as much from traveling in the opposite and entirely different directions. But I do think there's something to be said for taking a leap in life and seeing where you land; I simply can't believe I would ever have found the freedom to expand my creative horizons had I stayed in the city where I'd come of age. My thoughts about past and present, old country and new, resonate more powerfully right now because they come at a time when close family members have consciously moved back 'home' for their latter years. As I enjoy a few days relative peace and quiet here, I can only say how much I appreciate having such a beautiful home country to return to should I ever desire – and yet how grateful I am to have another beautiful country to call home for as long as I desire to in the mean time.

Emotive correspondence ended. I never could write quick postcards. That's why I make a point of avoiding them when on holiday. The next post will probably be from back in New York, start of next week. There's much to catch up on. Until then, take care.

Tony


THURSDAY JULY 17

HEDONISM IS HERE

Coming to the end of a long week in London promoting the release of Hedonism. It's all good. Fact, it's a total thrill to see it in the bookstores, on the front tables, in the new fiction section, sharing space with John Irving and the like. More on all of this later, but if any of you get Radio 6 on your digi-box, I'll be up bright and early tomorrow - that's Friday the 18th - to talk about the book with Phil Jupitus. Tune in at 9.30 am to see if I actually sound coherent after tonight's book launch. And I also taped a guest DJ slot with Sean Rowley for Radio London, which was enormous fun. Though I played music by such diverse acts as R.E.M., Chuck Jackson, A Guy Called Gerald, Dr Alimantado and Apocalypse, my host knew every single song; full credit to him for being such a music lover. The show goes out late night Saturday/early Sunday (2am-6am), but it's archived on the web for a full week: you should be able to get it from here. Fact, you should also be able to hear the Jupitus show up to a week later as well: try this link.

We're off for a weekend in the country and then I've got the rest of the week in Yorkshire before coming back to the States. Supposedly it's a holiday but assuming the modem is working, I'll keep posting.


THURSDAY JULY 17

MANCHESTER/MOVE MEMORIES

1) THE WEATHER: GOOD DAY SUNSHINE

No more jokes… The "grey, dreary, gloomy city that is Manchester" (as Michael Stipe described it from onstage) basked in nothing but sunshine throughout the weekend of the three-day Move festival, postcard-perfect weather amplified by nature's night-time light shows of multi-colored sunsets and a luminescent full moon. The mood was suitably upbeat in turn; Britain so rarely gets such ideal festival weather that only a true cynic (or Manchester's own Morrissey) could be anything but buoyant in the circumstances. Curiously, of the acts I saw, only non-Mancunians David Gahan and the R.E.M. commented on the beautiful conditions. The Manchester artists themselves simply got on with enjoying themselves. Perhaps they were trying to fool us visitors into believing their city always basks in such sunshine, but there were several indications that that's hardly the case. For one, the thousands of tomato-red Englishmen whose skin was clearly unfamiliar with such exposure to the sun. For another, the Pavilion (where we had VIP seats) where, perhaps fearful that it was all an illusion, the heating was kept on throughout the weekend…



2) ORIGINAL BAGGIES: INSPIRAL CARPETS

There were a handful of artists on the bill associated with the heyday of Madchester. Former Stone Roses guitarist John Squire played on Sunday, but sadly solo. The Charlatans topped Saturday's line-up, but they're not strictly a Manchester band. PureEssence, impressive though they were Saturday afternoon, only came on the scene in the mid-nineties. It was left to the Inspiral Carpets then, to demonstrate all that was best about baggy: floppy haircuts, bright clothes, sing-along pop songs, cool-as-fuck imagery, quietly subversive social lyrics, and that insouciant Mancunian swagger that is encapsulated in THE GROOVE.

The recently reformed band, in original line-up, no longer has quite such floppy hair or colorful clothes, but the other attributes are all still very much present and accounted for. Coming on stage to a repeated sample of "Inspiral Carpets, bigger bunch of wankers in the world," (add 'self-deprecating humor' to that former list), they rattled through a star-studded set which, as with their Brixton Academy show in April (read a longer review here), suggests that they may have been the best singles band to have come out of Manchester since The Smiths. If you doubt that claim, try this partial list: 'Commercial Rain,' 'Joe,' 'This Is How It Feels', 'She Comes In The Fall,' ' Saturn V,' 'I Want You' and 'Dragging Me Down.' '8.15 Train to Manchester' was a superb slice of garage rock, and 'Witness' came from nowhere – whether these were new songs, non-album tracks to which I'd not been exposed, or covers I couldn't tell you, but I did recognize the new single 'Come Back Tomorrow,' which owes a bigger debt to sixties Manchester pop stars The Hollies every time I hear it. All that, and they were even able to deliver the theme song for the festival, their twelve year old single 'Move.' (Though the refrain 'Move' should not to be confused with the incessant crowd mooing that cheerfully plays into the group's cow obsession.)

I wouldn't go so far as to say that the Inspiral Carpets were the peoples' band at Move, but there was a cheerfully hedonistic air surrounding their performance such as you usually only find at family reunions, weddings - and at the festival/festive return of hometown heroes. Judging by the number of finely-aged cow/cool t-shirts (and one very impressive home-made flag) doing the rounds, I'm not the only one thrilled by their return.


3) GET OFF YOUR ARSE: DAVID GAHAN

The Depeche Mode front man, who like his song-writing band mate Martin Gore recently released a solo album, has always been a rocker at heart. You want proof? Check the tattoos; check the former drug habit; check the session-muso band. And check the endless screamed exhortations (juxtaposed among his traditionally fey vocal deliveries) to "come on", to "get off your arses," to "show your hands." Tiresome though I find this demand for audience participation, it worked; by the end of the show, he had most of the 10,000 strong crowd singing along. His choice of material clearly helped; he quickly abandoned the dreary numbers from his Paper Monsters album, and focused instead on those Depeche Mode hits that best lend themselves to a hard rock arrangement: 'Question of Time', ' Walking in My Shoes', 'Personal Jesus,' 'I Feel You,' and 'Never Let Me Down Again,' the lyrics of which may or not, in retrospect, have drug connotations. Into the middle of these he threw 'Bottle Living', by far and away the best – and most Mode-like – song from Paper Monsters. I'd fully anticipated him having a harder time with this crowd, but Gahan's determination to gain rock credibility won out. Credit the weather, that people seemed up for everything and anything in the sunshine. But don't discredit Gahan's work ethic.


4) JUST WHEN YOU THINK THINGS ARE OVER: THE CHARLATANS

You've been knocking around for almost 15 years. You're a major band but you're not a MAJOR band. You get critical respect but you don't get media adulation. Your front man is about to release a solo album. What better way to squash rumors you're on the verge of breaking up than to perform a weekend of festival dates – including the prestigious Saturday night headlining slot in your nearest major city – and use the opportunity to air several new songs? 'Feel The Pressure,' 'I Grew For You' and 'Try Again Today', interspersed among a 90-minute set, suggest that the creative well from which the Charlatans draw continues to run deep, while the older songs – including 'The Only One I Know, 'Can't Even Be Bothered,' 'Just When You're Thinking Things Over,' 'A Man Needs To Be Told' - and 'Tellin' Stories' – demonstrated just how deep that well is to begin with. The band members are beginning to show their personal ages a little, filling out in all the familiar places for those pushing 40, but they're no less skimpy when it comes to delivery. The video close-ups of Jon Brookes, in particular, may have helped show the crowd at large what some of us have long known: The Charlatans have one of the hardest-working drummers in show business.

Mark Collins' guitar amp packed up mid-set, and the band struggled to keep the crowd amused while it was being fixed, causing vocalist Tim Burgess to announce "I bet you won't see this with R.E.M. tomorrow." True, we didn't. But nor did I see anyone wearing a t-shirt like the one which read "Tim Burgess you're such a hunk, come over here and fill me with your spunk."




5) KEVIN BAGNALL: THE ORIGINAL 'BAGGY'

He was three years above me at school. He was trumpet player in Apocalypse for the two years the band actually counted. He left just before it all went pear-shaped. He moved to Manchester 13 years ago. I haven't seen him since. He found me through the iJamming! site a couple of years ago and we had lunch together last Sunday. Kevin – who was understandably nicknamed Baggy when he landed in Madchester and answers to nothing else these days – was looking good; in fact, hipper than in the band days. We talked about the good times, the bad and all the bits in between. Like the time we wound up the crowd at Port Talbot (that's in Wales) with our cockney accents and one of them poured a pint of beer over our front man, Jeff Carrigan, in the bar afterwards. The night before, we'd played St. Austell (is that in Cornwall?) which Kevin insists was our best gig ever, to the point he swears that a group of Jam fans (you hardly think we filled the room on our own do you?) preferred talking with us than watching Weller and co run through their headlining set. He also reminded me we played down the road at the Manchester Apollo, which would have been when the Yoof TV crew from Channel 4 were following us around, setting us up for an almighty fall, and we were subjected to classic Fawlty Towers behavior: hotel maids entering our rooms despite the Do Not Enter signs and hovering round our beds at nine in the morning. (Beds? We used to dream of having beds!) Somewhere during that year, which would have been 1982, we also played Bridlington Spa with The Jam; I took a drive out there with the wife and the kid on Friday afternoon hoping to show them the venue. We got waylaid by fun fair rides instead. As was right. Time moves on and you should always enjoy the present. You're allowed to look back on the past with some nostalgia though. Kevin still has a full-on Sarf Landan accent, which he says has never been a problem in Manchester, a city he loves far more than the one he was born in. It was a delight to see him.


6) TURNING MADONNA DOWN: BADLY DRAWN BOY

The truly local hero of the weekend was not the Charlatans, nor the Inspiral Carpets, nor John Squire. It was Damon Gough, a.k.a. Badly Drawn Boy, who had to travel all of one mile from his Chorlton home to play the prestigious pre-R.E.M. slot on Sunday night. I saw Gough's New York debut at the Knitting Factory a couple of years back and hated it, but I've since come to realize he was deliberately deconstructing the hype, ensuring he wasn't awarded the same "future of rock'n'roll" status as wore down his hero Bruce Springsteen for a few mid-seventies years. Sunday afternoon, playing without a band, still swearing like a trooper and cheerfully insulting elements of the crowd as he made up songs on the spot and threw in a couple of unlikely covers, he occasionally let the mood slip but was still every inch a star. There were a handful of new songs from his forthcoming album with Andy Votel, one about seeing The Boss at the same cricket field last May ('Life Turned Upside Down'), another called 'This Is That New Song', and a third, politically correct number entitled 'Don't Ask Me, I'm Just the President,' with the non-rhyming non-sequitor (as if that's anything new for him) "No man should play God/Big Brother should end"). But these all paled next to the delivery of the intensely personal and emotional 'You Were Right', which he dedicated to girlfriend Clare, standing at the side of the stage. In other performers' hands, this would have seemed tacky, but with Gough, it just rendered the performance yet more beautiful, especially the lines about always wanting her for a wife, never having the guts to ask out right, preferring instead to hide the request in a song. Naturally, the woman alongside me started crying, but then they always do when you mention marriage.


7) PISSED UP BRITS

I grew up in the UK. I was a piss-head myself in my formative years. I come back here often enough that it shouldn’t surprise me. But it still does. The Brits get drunk like it’s their last day on earth – every day they can. Offer them a sunny rock festival and an all-day beer tent and you're lucky if they haven't fallen into a coma by tea-time. Which several of them did at Move.
The boozing was hardly restricted to Old Trafford. I'd (thankfully) forgotten what a major city like Manchester looks like at 2.30 in the morning when the late-bars and clubs empty and everyone pours onto the streets at the same time. (Here's a hint for the non-Brits: it's truly frightening.) And Sunday afternoon around the gay bars on the delightfully European Canal Street showed that it's hardly just the bulldog beer boys who take their tops off and order a lager when the sun comes out. I don't think I've seen more golden pints and pink skin in one city in one weekend in my life.
It's all good clean fun up to a point. That point is when someone goes over the top and insists on involving you in their drunken euphoria. When it's a cheerfully out-of-it girl slapping your bum and begging to get on your shoulders, it's bearable; when it's a bloke with a badly bleeding head running round, bumping into and hugging everyone in sight during the Charlatans' set, it becomes a real pain. A couple of people were sufficiently annoyed by bleeding head's intrusions that, after several minutes, they told him to f**k off. Bad idea. Turned out they were dealing with the living personification of Trainspotting's Begby (sp?): Bleeding head went psycho and started cracking skulls. No one wanted a part of it and an enormous hole opened up in the crowd, which only offered him a wider number of people to alternately hug and thump. The Charlatans were playing 'Love Is The Key' somewhere round that time…


8) ANIMAL pt. 1: FASHION

When I visited Beverley in April, I was thrilled to find that among the familiar high street chain stores, antique shops and coffee houses, a local young entrepreneur had dared to open a surfing-street style clothing store, Tea Tree Bay. (It's on Toll Gavel, if you're looking.) I was even more thrilled that amongst the Quicksilver and Rusty clothes I can get in the States, he was selling a brand new British brand, Animal. Instantly impressed by the cut and the colours, I picked up three items in rapid succession. I wore one of them to Old Trafford on Saturday, where I quickly realized I've not been alone in seizing good British street fashion when I see it. In fact, the variations on that blue-and-white theme may just have been the most popular clothing expression of the whole weekend. (Barring R.E.M. and Cool-as-Fuck t-shirts of course.) Sadly, some c**t threw a full pint of beer over the crowd during the Charlatans' set and the back of my predominantly white shirt is now indelibly stained. I'll call it a souvenir – and I'll be back to Tea Tree for more before my stay is over.


9) ALL BACK TO YOURS: THE HACIENDA

Walking round Manchester Sunday afternoon, I sensed my way toward the former Hacienda, site not just of British rave culture's birth, but of my Tube-presenting nadir, interviewing Morrissey while the band was still playing and we couldn't hear each other speak. It wasn't that hard to find the place: it’s busy being converted into (no-doubt expensive) apartments, with the suggestion 'Now that the party's over… you can come home. It's a shame to see the building converted from its former glory, but you can't blame the developers for seizing the opportunity. (After all, it wasn't they who closed the building down.) Of course, should you find yourself buying one of these yuppie flats and living somewhere near the DJ booth or the dance floor, you can expect your mates to insist you throw regular house parties – in every sense of the word.


10) ANIMAL pt 2: R.E.M.

I've made no great secret of the fact that Reveal comes twelfth in my list of R.E.M.'s top twelve studio albums. Nor did 'The Final Straw' particularly sway me when it showed up on the band's web site a few months back; I found it a little tired and overly familiar. The two other unreleased songs the band are currently performing, on the other hand, are absolutely exhilarating. 'Bad Day,' if Mojo magazine is to be believed, is drawn from the same original song as 'It's The End of The World', though it's a little more restrained and the lyrics seem surprisingly au courant ("We are sick of being jerked around… and we all fall down."). 'Animal' is more reminiscent of the band's best warped arena rockers, exuding a chaotic exuberance and a slew of great lyrics, including "Kiss me, fuck me, what's the big deal," and the line that Stipe was wearing across his shirt all Sunday night, "I'm vibrating at the speed of light." If this is where R.E.M.'s going with album 13, I'll place my order now.



These new songs were the highlights of a 100-minute set that barely steered clear of the 'Greatest Hits' package the group are set to release later this year. There was nothing at all prior to 1985's 'Fall On Me', and hardly a single obscurity (though the songs from Reveal would be unfamiliar to most Americans, ha-ha). New drummer Bill Rieflin was surprisingly restrained for someone formerly in Ministry, but the band was clearly firing on all cylinders. As somebody has mentioned to me since, there are only a few groups in the world who can truly rise to the festival occasion and R.E.M., indisputably, are one of them. Much is this is down to Stipe, whose crowd-pleasing personality I could never have predicted back in the old days. Walking the vast wings, jumping into the photographer's pit, playing God with the weather, lounging on the grand piano, he's the rock star whose sense of irony and humor keeps him (and ourselves) grounded. I particularly loved his introduction to 'Losing My Religion,' "This song is yours, we're happy to cover it for you."

My only previous experience seeing R.E.M. outdoors in Britain was their ill-fated Milton Keynes bowl appearance on June 21 1985, where it pissed down with rain for around six hours straight and the group, deep in their dour Fables mood, dodged bottles of piss for 45 minutes as they waxed lyrical about 'Wendell Gee' and 'Driver 8.' That was also the one and only time I've ever seen them be anything less than brilliant. Sunday night was thrilling, then, for a number of reasons - not least to sense just how enormously popular they remain in the UK precisely 20 years after they first came to the country's shores.

The crowd was not alone in its appreciation. As the band concluded with 'The One I Love' and 'It's The End of the World' the sun finally went down for the day and a full moon arose in its place on the other side of the horizon. It was that kind of weekend: seamless.

2003 MUSINGS:
JULY 7-13: Chuck Jackson live, Step On, Beverley Beat, British Way of Life
JUNE30-JULY6: David Beckham, Geoffrey Armes, Happy Mondays, Step On at Royale
JUNE 23-29: Ceasars/The Realistics live, weddings and anniversaries, Cabaret laws.
JUNE 9-23: Hell W10, The Clash, Big Audio Dynamite, Nada Surf live, Field Day debacle
JUNE 2-8: Six Feet Under - Over, Field Day, Siren Fest, Crouching Tigher Hidden Cigarette
MAY 19-JUNE 1: Ian McCulloch live, New York's financial woes, Six Feet Under, Hedonism, Tommy Guerrero.
MAY 5-18: Live reviews of The Rapture, De La Soul, Carlsonics, Laptop, The Libertines, Echoboy, The Greenhornes; observations on Chris Coco/The Blue Room, The Apple Music Store, Alan Freed, Phil Spector, The Matrix Reloaded, Rare Earth, Tinnitus and Royale!
APRIL 28-MAY 4: Flaming Lips, Madonna, Bill Maher, The Dixie Chicks, the war
APRIL 21-27: Rotary Connection, War(n) Out, Cocaine Talk
APRIL 14-20: Belated London Musings on Death Disco and CPFC.
APRIL 7-13: London Musings: Madness, Inspiral Carpets, the Affair, the Palace, the Jam
MARCH 31-APRIL 6: Music be the spice of life, London Calling: Ten Observations from the Old Country
MARCH 24-30: Six Foot Under, Peaches/Elefant live, MP Frees and Busted Boy Bands
MARCH 17-23: Röyksopp live, Transmission, Worn-Out War Talk
MARCH 10-16: Live reviews: Stratford 4, Flaming Sideburns, Joe Jackson Band, Linkin Park. Why I Oppose The War (For Now).
MARCH 3-9: The Pursuit of Happiness, Weekend Players, U.S. Bombs, Al Farooq, A New Pessimism, Brooklyn Half Marathon
FEBRUARY 24-MARCH2: Orange Park, Ali G-Saddam Hussein-Dan Rather-Bill Maher-Jon Stewart TV reviews, Stellastarr*, James Murphy, The Station nightclub fire, the Grammys
FEBRUARY 17-23: Village Voice Poll, Singles Club, Smoke and Fire
FEBRUARY 3-16: Snug, The Face, Pink, Supergrass live, Keith Moon, Phil Spector, Gore Vidal
JANUARY 27-FEBRUARY 2: Communist Chic, Spiritland, Daddy You're A Hero, Keith Moon, State of the Union, CPFC and more on Iraq
JANUARY 20-26: Divisions of Laura Lee, Burning Brides, Words On War, Child Abuse of a Different Kind, Losing My Edge
JANUARY 13-19: Pete Townshend, Pee Wee Herman, South Park and more Pete Townshend
JANUARY 6-12: Interpol in concert, Tony Fletcher's Top 10 Albums and Singles of 2002, More on Joe Strummer and The Clash, Fever Pitch and Bend It Like Beckham.
DECEMBER 31 2002 -JAN 5 2003: A tribute to Joe Strummer, Radio 4 live on New Year's Eve
2002 MUSINGS:
DECEMBER 25-30: NO POSTINGS: ON VACATION
DECEMBER 16-24: Metro Area, Breakbeat Science, Sting makes Wine, New York Downtown redesigns, Keith Moon anecdotes, Campbell's jokes.
DECEMBER 9-15:
Tiswas, pledge drives, The View from Up North
DECEMBER 2-8 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes Weekend Players and Snow Lit Piano Bars)
FOR NOVEMBER 25-29 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes Joe Hurley, Thanksgiving, Sven
Väth, Richie Hawtin)
FOR NOVEMBER 16-24 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes Longwave, The Pleased, Get Your War On, Powder, Radio 4, Supreme Beings Of Leisure, Ben Neill, Baldwin Brothers, Thievery Corporation)
FOR NOVEMBER 9-15 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes CMJ report including Datsuns, von Bondies and My Favorite, and political Eagles)
FOR NOVEMBER 2-8 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes Halloween, the New York Marathon, and British Cuisine)
FOR OCTOBER 26-NOV 1 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes live reviews of The Streets, Mooney Suzuki, Sahara Hotnights, Flaming Sideburns, Stellastarr*; Jam Master Jay; Halloween)
FOR OCTOBER 19-25 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes Underworld live, Atlantic Avenue antics, Girls and Boys night)
FOR OCTOBER 12-18 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes Bali Bombing and stupid editorials, the Electro-Clash festival, VHS Or Beta, Ballboy, Mindless Self Indulgence, 2 Many DJs, Tom Petty, The Streets, pointless stop-the-war e-mails)
FOR OCTOBER 5-11 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes Steve Earle and John Walker's Blues, Dreaming Of Britney, Girls Against Boys and Radio 4)
FOR SEPTEMBER 28-OCT 4 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes White Stripes live, Morel live, My Generation re-issue)
FOR SEPTEMBER 21-27 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes The Creation live, Village Voice, Wine not Whine and more)
FOR SEPTEMBER 14-20 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes Firefighter Andre Fletcher, Untamed, Uncut, and more September 11 Musings)
FOR SEPTEMBER 7-13 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes Sep 11 memorials, Did Bin Laden Win?, Scissor Sisters and Electro-clash)
FOR AUGUST 31-SEPTEMBER 6 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes The Strokes live, The Rising, Saint Etienne, Team USA, a.i., Tahiti 80, Dot Allison)
FOR AUGUST 17-30 DAILY MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes holiday musings, wine reviews, Luna at Southpaw, and more)
FOR AUGUST 10-16 DAILY MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes lengthy Who live review)
FOR JULY 27-AUG 9 DAILY MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes Area 2, 24 Hour Party People Party, Hootenanny Tour, 2 Many DJs and more.
FOR JULY 20-26 DAILY MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes Wilson Pickett, John Entwistle, rebuilding downtown NYC)
FOR JULY 13-19 DAILY MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes Love Parade, Teany, RenewNYC, Femi Kuti, NRA, Londonisation of New York, Britishification of Global Rock)
FOR JULY 6-12 DAILY MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes Mike Meyers as Keith Moon, the RAVE Act, John Entwistle, Michael Jackson, Southpaw, Moby Online, Layo & Bushwacka!,
(accidentally deleted)
FOR JUNE 29-JULY 5 DAILY MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes World Cup Final, John Entwistle's legacy, The Who's decision to carry on, the meaning of July 4)
FOR JUNE 22-28 DAILY MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes World Cup diary, Dr. John, Doves, Mermaid Parade, John Entwistle's death, Timothy White's death, Clinic Firewater and Radio 4 live, The Who's decision to carry on)
FOR JUNE 15-21 DAILY MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes World Cup diary, Liars live, GiantFingers, the Big Takeover)
FOR JUNE 8 -14 DAILY MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes World Cup diary, StellaStarr*, Jose Padilla, Dee Dee Ramone, suicide bombings)
FOR JUNE 1-7 DAILY MUSINGS, CLICK HERE (includes World Cup diary, Southpaw, Six Foot Under, Andrew Sullivan)
FOR LATE MAY DAILY MUSINGS, CLICK HERE
FOR MAY'S EIGHT DAYS IN A WEEK'S MUSINGS, CLICK HERE
FOR LATE APRIL LONDON MUSINGS, CLICK HERE
FOR EARLY APRIL MUSINGS, CLICK HERE


iJamming! Site Copyright Tony Fletcher 2003




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This page last updated
Thu, Jun 24, 2004 4:28 pm)


THE JULY HITLIST:
10 NEW NEW YORK ALBUMS

THE JUNE HITLIST:
15 NEW ALBUMS
10 OLD ALBUMS
5 MOVIES

THE MAY HITLIST:
20 NEW ALBUMS,
1 ONLINE ESSENTIAL,
3 NEW MAGAZINES

FEATURED MIX CD:
2 CD's & MP3's

FEATURED ALBUM:
THE OLD KIT BAG by RICHARD THOMPSON

FEATURED WINE:
CHAPEL DOWN HORIZON, England

INSPIRAL CARPETS
live at the Brixton Academy

The iJamming! Interview:
2 MANY DJs
"We bypassed the record company and the industry - we just did this thing and it went off."

From the Jamming! Archives:
KILLING JOKE
interviewed in 1981

WHY I OPPOSE THE WAR
as of March 11

THE MARCH HITLIST:
5 SUPERB COMPILATIONS
20 ALBUMS, 5 EPs

THE FEBRUARY HITLIST:
25 ALBUMS

2002: THE YEAR IN REVIEW
Ten Major Memories and a number of lists

INTERPOL in concert

JOE STRUMMER: A TRIBUTE

THE DECEMBER HITLIST:
5 ALBUMS, EPs, MIX CDS, COMPILATIONS and SONGS

the iJamming! Book Review
WHY TERRORISM WORKS
by Alan Dershowitz

CABERNET FRANC
The 'Other' Cabernet Grape Takes Root In New York
Part 1: The Basics/Regions
Part 2: New York Wines
Part 3: Loire Wines
Part 4: Conclusions

THE NOVEMBER HITLIST
30 Albums 10 Songs

HOW MUCH WILL IT HURT?:
Tips for the marathon virgin.

From the Jamming! Archives:
THE JAM
Interviewed in 1979

The iJamming! Interview: UNDERWORLD
NOW WITH LIVE PHOTOS

Coming and Going
Chapter 3: THE PALACE

The iJamming! Interview
RICHARD BUTLER Part 2

From the Jamming! Archives:
ADAM ANT
Interviewed in 1978

REMARKS REMADE:
Available Now!
The introduction to the new edition of my R.E.M. biography is here.

A Decade In Dance
BT & BANCO DE GAIA
10 Years (Apiece)

2 MANY TASTINGS:
The iJamming! Wine Round Up October 2002, including:
Sauvignon Blanc
Chardonnay
Pinot Noir
Rhône Rangers
Southern France
Zinfandel

HALF MAN HALF BISCUIT
The whole 1990s catalogue

From the Jamming! Archives:
PAUL WELLER
interviewed in 1978

The iJamming! interview:
CARL COX

GOLDEN SHOT hostess 'Lee Patrick' recalls her time as Keith Moon's amour

HEDONISM:
An intrigue of early 90s New York nightlife.
NEW CHAPTER now online

From the Jamming! Archives:
U2 interviewed in 1984.

iJamming! Wino/Muso:
JOHN ACQUAVIVA

The iJAMMING! interview:
DAVID SYLVIAN

From the Keith Moon archives:
the JEFF BECK interview .

The iJAMMING! chat:
MARK PERRY

TRAVIS.
Fran Healy explains why "you cannot own a song."

From the JAMMING! archives: The Story That Spawned Creation

The iJAMMING! interview:
BOY GEORGE.

The full iJamming! Contents