iJAMMING! is a music and lifestyle web site hosted by
author, journalist and dee jay Tony Fletcher.
Click on the buttons above to access all areas of the site.
For the newest additions, see index at left.
For the iJamming! mission statement click here.
Tony's daily musings are posted on this page.

Friday January 2nd:

STEP ON

Resident DJs Tony Fletcher and Posie will be joined by Desko 2000.

The Royale, 506 Fifth Avenue, Park Slope, Brooklyn, between 12th/13th Street. 9pm. (718 840 0089.).

(Read about previous Step Ons here & here.)

FRIDAY JANUARY 2 2004

I BELIEVE IN MIRACLES

Did you know that the population of the USA grows by one person every ten seconds? Did you know that British consumption of wine rose 69% in the last seven years, faster than any other nation in the world? Did I tell you that when I was in Paris a few months ago, of all snobbish places, the restaurant owner told me that the British are "the greatest wine connoisseurs in the world?" (Admittedly, he was Tunisian!) Does anyone in New York City who hates Mayor Bloomberg for introducing the anti-smoking laws in bars and clubs stop to think that New York State actually passed a stronger law just three months later, meaning that Bloomberg's actions were in fact almost irrelevant? Did anyone know that contrary to the widespread assertion that the anti-smoking legislation would put bars and clubs out of business, applications for liquor licenses are on the increase?

Did everyone here at iJamming! have a good New Year? I had a weird one, went through a frightening experience. That's as much as I want to say about it, except to say I turned out the light on the year at 11.59pm and quietly celebrated how all's well that ends well.

Does anyone here at iJamming! want to stick up for The Strokes' Room On Fire as one of the albums of 2003, the way many people have? Or Justin Timberlake's Justified, the way some critics have chosen? Or prefer simply to promote your own obscurity? If so, join in the discussion over at The Pub, where a few readers have stepped forth with their faves of the last 12 months, including, to my shame, several I haven't yet heard for myself. I'll be DJing some of my own top tunes from the last year (and the 40-odd ones preceding it) at Step On tonight, and posting my Top 10s of 2003 on Monday, when normal service will be properly resumed.

Between now and then, if I could find a bookies, I might even put money on Palace beating Tottenham in The FA Cup tomorrow, given that I now believe in miracles. And I defy anyone at the site – and that includes you, Kevin – not to wish Yeovil the best of luck in taking on Liverpool this Sunday.


TUESDAY DECEMBER 30

HAPPY NEW YEAR AND ALL THAT...

Time flies when you're off in the woods for the Christmas holidays with three generations of Fletchers. For all that I thought I'd catch up on movies, music and reading, only the first medium has received anything like the due attention. And most of that was spent on Lord of the Rings. Not just the trilogy's three and a quarter hour conclusion The Return of the King, which we finally saw in the cinema this past Sunday, but revisiting the second movie The Two Towers to remind myself what the hell was going on with the plot.

Posie, Campbell and myself fell for the Lord of the Rings trilogy in a big way after picking up the first movie on DVD a year ago: we love the landscapes, the characters, the special effects, and, we guiltily admit, we're particularly fond of the battles – and for all that we initially worried that these gruesome fight scenes might not be the best thing to expose to our 7-8 year old, the entire movie is so clearly an epic struggle between good and evil that we decided the violence was justified (and not least by the fact that it's so absurd it's almost cartoon). On another level, I enjoyed watching this classic depiction of the hero's journey, something I had researched in depth while writing Hedonism.

Special effects rule in The Return of The King.

All said, The Return of the King felt excruciatingly long in the cinema and failed to unleash the emotional responses we'd anticipated. Perhaps our expectations were too high; perhaps those cinema seats simply aren't designed for such lengthy sessions. Perhaps, ultimately, there was simply too big a storyline, too many battles, too much… of everything. Peter Jackson pulled off a cinematic miracle of sorts, but his triumph was complete almost before the first movie was released: in bringing such a talented team to the other side of the world and forcing many of them to live together for the best part of three years, he created a camaraderie that's evident in all three of the final pictures, which explains in large part why we're willing to believe in the characters and follow their journeys through Middle Earth. Jackson also avoided the pitfalls of the abysmal Matrix sequels (and pretty much every other movie franchise) by making the films simultaneously, staying true to his original vision rather than second-guessing himself and playing up to expectations second and third time around.

For our own part, we probably had as much fun watching the bonus DVD that came with The Two Towers, envying the younger actors whose three years away from home, surfing and snowboarding in New Zealand during rare time off, certainly beat joining the Army. Is there anyone who took part in the Trilogy that won't look back on it and say it was a highlight of their lives? I doubt it.

150 year old surfing Crush and his offspring Squirt help Marlin and Dory find Nemo

Also on the bonus DVD front, young Campbell was gifted Finding Nemo for Christmas, and while the film revealed another layer of sophistication once watched in the comfort of the home (I no longer believe Brother Bear to be better), it was the additional material that really had us in stitches. And you don't need to have a kid to appreciate its balance between education and entertainment, which peaks in Jean-Michel Cousteau's short documentary about protecting the coral reef, continually interrupted by the movie's animated stars, Nemo, Marlin and Dory. (Cousteau, playing along gamely with the concept, is shown on board his boat, bemoaning, "This would never have happened to Papa.") On the subject of Dory, and the final word on films for now, do they give Oscars for best voiceover? If so, this year's belongs to Ellen DeGeneres, who absolutely makes Finding Nemo with her performance as the forgetful but ever-optimistic Dory. Interestingly, I had missed her following line in the movie, which did not escape the females in our house when we viewed it on DVD: "What is it with men and asking directions?"


What is it about men and lists? I spent less time listening to music this past week than reading about it, studying the end-of-year lists and wondering if there isn't a web site somewhere that gathers them all together to construct a Best of Best Of The Year List. If so, likelihood is that The White Stripes' Elephant will be the internationally acclaimed number 1 album of the year, based on my own survey of the surveys, with Outkast and Radiohead fighting for silver and bronze, and then Blur, the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Missy Elliott, Dizzee Rascal, Elbow, The Rapture and, depending if you're British, the Darkness rounding out the top 10.

Critics (a term I hate but one that's justified here) are by nature a contrarian bunch, which is why Justin Timberlake shows up in some charts, Britney in some others, and Christina in yet others. Personally,I don't see any of those three offerings standing the test of time. (But then I don't believe The Strokes' Room on Fire will still be getting played in three months, and that didn't stop that album making many Year-End Lists too.)

Failed Revolutionary of the Year: Madonna and her American Life

One album conspicuous by its absence from every end-of-year poll I've yet scrutinized, despite the fact it entered both British and American charts at number 1: Madonna's American Life. I've always believed that the public eventually recognizes its got a lame dog in its hands even if it's already paid for the thing. Then again, that's assuming, there was no manipulation of the charts in the first place.

On which note, and in the spirit of the season, I'll leave the last word of the year to the same issue of The Observer's monthly music magazine which I rightly savaged two weeks ago for its lazy retelling of an inaccurate Keith Moon anecdote. Garry Mulholland declares 2003 the "best year for singles since the late Eighties," and refutes the format's apparent demise with the following logical explanation:

"Remember the early Eighties and 'home taping is killing music'? Well it took a little time…
Except that downloading won't kill music, even if it does affect the music industry. There is a difference … There are plenty of legal download paysites, including a legal Napster and the forthcoming UK launch of Apple's iTunes, which is already a huge success in the US. There will be a downloaded songs chart followed by a merge with the retail singles chart, and everyone hopes that the charts will again be a representation of what 'the kids' like, rather than which corporate giant can afford the biggest discounts and most aggressive marketing."

I'll drink to that. (Best wine of the holiday season? The Domaine Alary 1998 Côtes du Rhône-Villages Cairanne Reserve du Vignerons, a 66% Grenache/33% Mourvèdre blend that exemplified the spicy, sophisticated, and expectionally pretty flavors of this delightful southern Rhône Village. And only $15 at time of purchase.) And it looks like I'm having last word after all. Which is: Happy New Year. Normal service will be resumed next week.


WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 24

SO THIS IS...

Had a chance to look at a couple of end-of-year Best Of 2003 Lists, mostly in the hope of being inspired for my own. It's going to be hard work this year. For all that I enthuse over music every day, I'm looking at some of the albums I reviewed and recommended this past twelve months – Groove Armada, say, or Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, or Joe Jackson, Cerys Matthews, Slipstream, David Bowie, Fountains of Wayne – and I'm not sure I see them screaming All-Time Classic the way both veterans like Bruce Springsteen and Tom Petty, and newcomers The Streets and 2 Many DJs laid their claim to eternal fame last year.

Both Q magazine and Mojo consider The White Stripes' Elephant to be album of the year, and rate Blur's Think Tank most highly. (The Observer monthly music magazine placed Blur at number 1.) Fair enough, perhaps, but the same papers also put Justin Timberlake, Kings of Leon and The Strokes in the top 10, which I would find impossible. Pitchforkmedia.com, the best American-based indie music web site out there has, in defiance of the usual build-em-up-knock-em-down approach, opted for the Rapture at number 1 and Radiohead at number 4, and then confirmed its insider credibility by having Manitoba, the Books and Sufjan Stevens round out the top 5. (No, I don't know any of those three either.)

The Rapture record is, I believe, possibly the year's most important (if belated) album, because of its determined genre-bending, its insistence on finding a (deliriously) happy middle ground for rock fans and dance heads alike. As such (and for the fact that it works), it deserves a higher placing than rock'n'roll revivalists Kings of Leon and The Strokes, and even than those celebrated left-field commercial success stories The White Stripes and Yeah Yeah Yeahs. I can certainly see The Rapture making my top 10. I can see it definitely being joined by The Stratford 4, quite possibly by Stellastarr*, maybe by The Fiery Furnaces – one of those records I'm awestruck by whenever it hits the decks – and certainly by The Raveonettes' Chain Gang of Love, which I now think is genius and which I'll happily upgrade from the A- review I gave it to a full A. My disappointment in the state of British dance was noted when I reviewed ten albums from that genre together earlier in December; I'd love to say I couldn't live without recent albums by Plump DJs, Basement Jaxx or Goldfrapp, but truth be told, I can.

Scanning quickly through Mojo – I hope to read it properly over the holidays – I see no lesser authority than former Roxy DJ, Clash video director and B.A.D. member Don Letts cites Joe Strummer's Streetcore as his album of the year. I'd like to think he's doing more than merely promoting a dead friend when he states that "(Strummer's) gone just when he's produced his best work." The way I feel today, it will be hard for me not to name Streetcore my own album of the year.

So I'll spend the Christmas week off musing over my Top 10. Maybe you want to do the same. Tell us your own Top 5 or Top 10s over a festive drink at the Pub. It will be informative for me to see whether readers at iJamming! actually share my musical tastes or not.

While we're talking awards, I scanned that leaked list of people who've turned down a place on the Queen's New Year's Honours List found it particularly fascinating that Bowie's name was on there. Coming in a year when Mick Jagger clearly reveled in his promotion to knighthood, I see it as confirming who's the real South London rebel rebel. Who's happy to stay on the outside. And who, ultimately, always wanted to be loved.

A thank you to everyone who donated to Keep iJamming! Thriving. (An explanation for our Pledge Drive is offered here.) Some chose to remain anonymous, for whom extra special thanks. Those who named themselves, we know who you are, and we're extremely grateful. The donation boxes will stay out over the holidays but now's the time to reward yourself. Merry Christmas everyone. Happy Hannukah to those for whom it's relevant. Or, as one of my wine friends put it with a focus on the French, "bonnes fêtes de fin d'année." I plan to be back before the New Year. I hope you will be too.

Amazon Honor System Click Here to PayLearn More


TUESDAY DECEMBER 23

"I'VE GOT TO HURRY UP BEFORE I GROW TOO OLD"

It was a year ago today we woke to the news that Joe Strummer, former Clash frontman and eternal punk rocker, had died of a sudden heart attack after walking his dog near his Somerset home. He was fifty years old.

Last night, on the first anniversary of his departure, Irving Plaza played host to a concert benefiting Strummerville, "a charitable foundation for the promotion of new music." I had planned to attend, primarily to hear Radio 4 take on the greatest punk-reggae song ever, '(White Man) In Hammersmith Palais,' but circumstances conspired against me. Sadly, the rest of the line-up was hardly A-List, unless you're a particularly committed fans of Ari Up, The Realistics or Ted Leo. I'm trusting the line-up was less a reflection of Joe's posthumous popularity than of New York bands' scheduling conflicts just a few days prior to Christmas.

Anyway, I've been listening to Strummer's final album Streetcore almost relentlessly these past few weeks. I have little doubt it's going to show up in the Top 10 list I'll be sending the way of the Village Voice in the next week or so. I've already reviewed the album in glowing terms over at this page, but something occurred to me yesterday that I want to offer as an addendum, another reason why Streetcore is so stirring. It's as simple as the fact that Joe didn't know he was going to drop dead, had absolutely no reason to believe he wasn't going to return to the studio this past new year and finish his album. Streetcore is therefore the sound of an inspirational figure, newly fifty, loving life and living it to the full, and capturing that enthusiasm on tape. By comparison, the deaths of Johnny Cash and Warren Zevon this past year, and of Joey Ramone the year before, were fully anticipated; each of those artists' last releases reflected the advance awareness of their finality. Streetcore, for all that it was left unfinished, just sounds… alive. The lyric I've quoted as my headline above, from the final, traditional song 'Silver and Gold,' demonstrates Strummer's spirit. What better epitaph could he leave?


As Strummer proved to the end, life is for living. It's a lesson that appears to have been learned by the former Crystal Palace captain Geoff Thomas, who is fighting a particularly lethal form of leukaemia, hoping that a bone marrow donation from his sister in the New Year will save his life. Thomas led the Palace team to the FA Cup Final in 1990; God knows how many times I found myself singing "When Geoff goes up to lift the FA Cup…" that memorable week in May, only for Manchester United captain Bryan Robson to get the honour instead after a painful Thursday night Wembley replay. That Palace team, managed by the great Steve Coppell, disintegrated a couple of seasons later, Thomas going on to play for Wolves and Nottingham Forest. Fittingly, Thomas led Palace and Forest onto the Selhurst Park field on December 13, where he was rightly giving a prodigal son's heroic welcome: football fans are a loyal lot, and they particularly remember the fighting players, those who had real commitment and dedication. Geoff Thomas, though he struggled to emulate his club form in the England shirt, was one of those players. He is 39, the same age as me. Here’s hoping the bone marrow transplant proves successful.

I read up on Thomas in detail thanks to a hard copy of The Observer's sports section, brought over to New York by my mother, who's visiting for the holidays. The Geoff Thomas story takes up the whole of page 7; the whole of page 8 is filled with a much more positive piece about Chris Coleman, another Palace player of the same era, who is currently enjoying great success as manager of highly placed Premier team Fulham. Because the two features were commissioned separately, because you have to turn the page to get from one to the other, no comparisons are offered. But leaving aside the frustrating conclusion that Palace players often go on to make their real impact at other clubs, the features demonstrate how fate rolls the dice. Thomas and Coleman, two Palace greats, of the same era and approximately the same age… one has been dealt leukemia, one has been blessed to discover he's a natural leader. Both of them hopefully know to make the most of what they've got before it's gone. If not, Joe Strummer's legacy looms large enough to remind them. Meantime, I'm off to hear Streetcore again.

More Strummer at iJamming!:
STREETCORE reviewed here
JOE STRUMMER: A Tribute
More on Strummer and the Clash
JOE STRUMMER at St. Ann's Warehouse, Brooklyn, April 2002
HELL W10 and the Essential Clash DVD



MONDAY DECEMBER 21

GO TELL IT AT THE BEACON

Well, we were late getting into the spirit of the season, but the last few days appear to have made up for it style. We embarked on a seemingly endless round of neighborhood parties over the weekend, the last of which continued from its intended mild Sunday afternoon shindig well into the evening thanks to my Step On souvenir CD, a copy of which can also be found on the Southpaw jukebox. Some forward-thinking retrospective record label would be well-advised to have me mix these tracks DJ style for a commercial release. I'm serious.

Friday night we 'did something different', attending the Blind Boys Of Alabama's festive concert at the Beacon Theater. The venue's grand architecture and splendid acoustics provided the ideal setting for the venerable, if distinctly ageing gospel group, who could perhaps have filled the seats on their own but were certainly helped by a heavily advertised star-studded guest line-up. I haven't heard their latest Real World release Go Tell It on The Mountain, and I note that the usually reliable AllMusicGuide dismisses the celebrity-filled album as "a novelty record without novelty." But on Friday night, the musical guests – John Medeski on Hammond organ, Robert Randolph on occasional pedal steel, Duke Robilard here and there on guitar and Charlie Musclewhite popping in for the odd blow of the harmonica - augmented the headliners rather than suffocating them.

The guest vocalists, meanwhile, varied sufficiently in style and substance to keep things interesting. Aaron Neville sung 'Joy To The World' (a capella) and 'People Get Ready'; Mavis Staples belted out 'Nobody's Fault But Mine'; and Chrissie Hynde offered 'In the Bleak Midwinter.' But it was the first, least famous guest, Michael Franti, who was most commanding: he delivered a deeply resonating spoken accompaniment to the Blind Boys' own rendition of 'The Little Drummer Boy,' which he ended with the words, "Shalom, Salaam, Amen, One Heart, One Love, One Drum." He then attacked 'If I Had A Hammer' with a gusto that was matched by Blind Boy Jimmy Carter's enthusiastic vertical dancing.

Blind Boy Jimmy Carter working the crowd; at the Beacon he took to the aisles. Photo cribbed from the gospel group's web site.

Carter, who's 70 if he's day, later brought the show to its peak by taking to the aisles while singing 'I'm A Soldier In the Army of The Lord,' and pogoing around like a young Sid Vicious. It's guaranteed crowd-pleasing activity and the sight of so many probably secular white people raising their arms in the air at Carter's behest was self-consciously amusing. (All the more so as the concert was being filmed for a forthcoming PBS special and no doubt an accompanying DVD.) Carter and his fellow vocalists, George Scott and Clarence Fountain, (drummer Ricky McKinnie is the other sightless veteran), sadly then blew it by dragging the song out a good ten minutes longer than needed. (Being blind, they would not have noticed that the audience had long stopped waving its arms in the air and returned to their seats, but their younger full-time guitarist and bass player might do well to inform them.) They redeemed themselves by bringing everyone on for an all-star encore of the timely if optimistic 'Ain't Gonna Study War No More,' which ensured that the audience left with a smile on its collective face as wide as a child's on Christmas Day. Something I also hope to have great pleasure witnessing this Thursday.


Don't forget to check out the latest iJamming! Hitlists, reviews of recent albums grouped by genre:
Solo Stars
Tripped Out Brits
Global Techtronica
British Dance

2003 MUSINGS:
DEC 15-21: Placebo live, Park Slope, Angels In America, Saddam's capture
DEC 8-14: The Rapture live, Guardian readers change lightbulbs, Keep iJamming! Thriving
DEC 1-7: Cabaret Laws, Ready Brek, Kinky Friedman, Sir Ranulph Fiennes, Jonathan Lethem, Julie Burchill, Blizzard running
NOV 17-30: Lost In Music, Lost In Translation, Neil Boland, Political Polls, Press Clips, Australian Whines
NOV 10-16: Ben E. King live, Hedonism readings, A***nal, Charts on Fire
NOV 3-9: Brother Bear, Oneida, P. Diddy, Steve Kember, Guy Fawkes, Iraq, the Marathon
OCT 27-NOV 2: CMJ Music Marathon report, NYC Running Marathon preview, Prey For Rock'n'Roll, Yellow Dog, Gen Wesley Clark, Halloween
OCT 20-26: Television Personalities, defending New York rockers, Bill Drummond Is Read
OCT 6-19: LCD Soundsystem live, Renewable Brooklyn review, Blind Acceptance is a sign...
SEP29-OCT 5: New York w(h)ines parts 1 and 2, Bruce Springsteen at Shea Stadium.
SEP 22-28: Atlantic Antic, Pacifists for War: General Wesley Clark and the Democratic Debate, Danny Tenaglia, Running Wild, Steppenwolf
SEP 15-21: Radio 4/DJ Vadim live, Manhattan Mondaze, Circle of Light, Renewable Brooklyn
SEP 8-14: Central Park Film Festival, Roger (Daltrey) and me, September 11 Revisited, The Raveonettes/Stellastarr* live, Recording Idiots of America,
SEP1-7: Film Festivities, Party Monster, Keith Moon RIP
AUG 25-31: Punk Planet, Carlsonics, Copyright Protection, Cline Zinfandel, BRMC
AUG 18-24: Black Out Blame Game, John Shuttleworth, British Music mags, Greg Palast, The Thrills live.
AUG 11-17: The New York blackout, Restaurant reviews, The Media as Watchdog, What I Bought On My Holidays
AUG 4-10: Step On again, Shaun W. Ryder, Jack magazine, the BBC, the Weather, Detroit Cobras, football and Rock'n'Roll
JULY 28-AUG 3: De La Guarda, The Rapture, Radio 4, Stellastarr*, Jodie Marsh, A Tale of Two Lions, Hedonism launch photos,
JULY 14-27: Manchester Move Memories, Hedonism is Here, Holiday postcard
JULY 7-13: Chuck Jackson live, Step On, Beverley Beat, British Way of Life
JUNE30-JULY6: David Beckham, Geoffrey Armes, Happy Mondays, Step On at Royale
JUNE 23-29: Ceasars/The Realistics live, weddings and anniversaries, Cabaret laws.
JUNE 9-23: Hell W10, The Clash, Big Audio Dynamite, Nada Surf live, Field Day debacle
JUNE 2-8: Six Feet Under - Over, Field Day, Siren Fest, Crouching Tigher Hidden Cigarette
MAY 19-JUNE 1: Ian McCulloch live, New York's financial woes, Six Feet Under, Hedonism, Tommy Guerrero.
MAY 5-18: Live reviews of The Rapture, De La Soul, Carlsonics, Laptop, The Libertines, Echoboy, The Greenhornes; observations on Chris Coco/The Blue Room, The Apple Music Store, Alan Freed, Phil Spector, The Matrix Reloaded, Rare Earth, Tinnitus and Royale!
APRIL 28-MAY 4: Flaming Lips, Madonna, Bill Maher, The Dixie Chicks, the war
APRIL 21-27: Rotary Connection, War(n) Out, Cocaine Talk
APRIL 14-20: Belated London Musings on Death Disco and CPFC.
APRIL 7-13: London Musings: Madness, Inspiral Carpets, the Affair, the Palace, the Jam
MARCH 31-APRIL 6: Music be the spice of life, London Calling: Ten Observations from the Old Country
MARCH 24-30: Six Feet Under, Peaches/Elefant live, MP Frees and Busted Boy Bands
MARCH 17-23: Röyksopp live, Transmission, Worn-Out War Talk
MARCH 10-16: Live reviews: Stratford 4, Flaming Sideburns, Joe Jackson Band, Linkin Park. Why I Oppose The War (For Now).
MARCH 3-9: The Pursuit of Happiness, Weekend Players, U.S. Bombs, Al Farooq, A New Pessimism, Brooklyn Half Marathon
FEBRUARY 24-MARCH2: Orange Park, Ali G-Saddam Hussein-Dan Rather-Bill Maher-Jon Stewart TV reviews, Stellastarr*, James Murphy, The Station nightclub fire, the Grammys
FEBRUARY 17-23: Village Voice Poll, Singles Club, Smoke and Fire
FEBRUARY 3-16: Snug, The Face, Pink, Supergrass live, Keith Moon, Phil Spector, Gore Vidal
JANUARY 27-FEBRUARY 2: Communist Chic, Spiritland, Daddy You're A Hero, Keith Moon, State of the Union, CPFC and more on Iraq
JANUARY 20-26: Divisions of Laura Lee, Burning Brides, Words On War, Child Abuse of a Different Kind, Losing My Edge
JANUARY 13-19: Pete Townshend, Pee Wee Herman, South Park and more Pete Townshend
JANUARY 6-12: Interpol in concert, Tony Fletcher's Top 10 Albums and Singles of 2002, More on Joe Strummer and The Clash, Fever Pitch and Bend It Like Beckham.
DECEMBER 31 2002 -JAN 5 2003: A tribute to Joe Strummer, Radio 4 live on New Year's Eve
2002 MUSINGS:
DECEMBER 25-30: NO POSTINGS: ON VACATION
DECEMBER 16-24:Metro Area, Breakbeat Science, Sting makes Wine, New York Downtown redesigns, Keith Moon anecdotes, Campbell's jokes.
DECEMBER 9-15:Tiswas, pledge drives, The View from Up North
DECEMBER 2-8 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes Weekend Players and Snow Lit Piano Bars)
FOR NOVEMBER 25-29 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes Joe Hurley, Thanksgiving, Sven Väth, Richie Hawtin)
FOR NOVEMBER 16-24 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes Longwave, The Pleased, Get Your War On, Powder, Radio 4, Supreme Beings Of Leisure, Ben Neill, Baldwin Brothers, Thievery Corporation)
FOR NOVEMBER 9-15 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes CMJ report including Datsuns, von Bondies and My Favorite, and political Eagles)
FOR NOVEMBER 2-8 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes Halloween, the New York Marathon, and British Cuisine)
FOR OCTOBER 26-NOV 1 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes live reviews of The Streets, Mooney Suzuki, Sahara Hotnights, Flaming Sideburns, Stellastarr*; Jam Master Jay; Halloween)
FOR OCTOBER 19-25 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes Underworld live, Atlantic Avenue antics, Girls and Boys night)
FOR OCTOBER 12-18 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes Bali Bombing and stupid editorials, the Electro-Clash festival, VHS Or Beta, Ballboy, Mindless Self Indulgence, 2 Many DJs, Tom Petty, The Streets, pointless stop-the-war e-mails)
FOR OCTOBER 5-11 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes Steve Earle and John Walker's Blues, Dreaming Of Britney, Girls Against Boys and Radio 4)
FOR SEPTEMBER 28-OCT 4 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes White Stripes live, Morel live, My Generation re-issue)
FOR SEPTEMBER 21-27 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes The Creation live, Village Voice, Wine not Whine and more)
FOR SEPTEMBER 14-20 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes Firefighter Andre Fletcher, Untamed, Uncut, and more September 11 Musings)
FOR SEPTEMBER 7-13 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes Sep 11 memorials, Did Bin Laden Win?, Scissor Sisters and Electro-clash)
FOR AUGUST 31-SEPTEMBER 6 MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes The Strokes live, The Rising, Saint Etienne, Team USA, a.i., Tahiti 80, Dot Allison)
FOR AUGUST 17-30 DAILY MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes holiday musings, wine reviews, Luna at Southpaw, and more)
FOR AUGUST 10-16 DAILY MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes lengthy Who live review)
FOR JULY 27-AUG 9 DAILY MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes Area 2, 24 Hour Party People Party, Hootenanny Tour, 2 Many DJs and more.
FOR JULY 20-26 DAILY MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes Wilson Pickett, John Entwistle, rebuilding downtown NYC)
FOR JULY 13-19 DAILY MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes Love Parade, Teany, RenewNYC, Femi Kuti, NRA, Londonisation of New York, Britishification of Global Rock)
FOR JULY 6-12 DAILY MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes Mike Meyers as Keith Moon, the RAVE Act, John Entwistle, Michael Jackson, Southpaw, Moby Online, Layo & Bushwacka!,
(accidentally deleted)
FOR JUNE 29-JULY 5 DAILY MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes World Cup Final, John Entwistle's legacy, The Who's decision to carry on, the meaning of July 4)
FOR JUNE 22-28 DAILY MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes World Cup diary, Dr. John, Doves, Mermaid Parade, John Entwistle's death, Timothy White's death, Clinic Firewater and Radio 4 live, The Who's decision to carry on)
FOR JUNE 15-21 DAILY MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes World Cup diary, Liars live, GiantFingers, the Big Takeover)
FOR JUNE 8 -14 DAILY MUSINGS CLICK HERE (includes World Cup diary, StellaStarr*, Jose Padilla, Dee Dee Ramone, suicide bombings)
FOR JUNE 1-7 DAILY MUSINGS, CLICK HERE (includes World Cup diary, Southpaw, Six Foot Under, Andrew Sullivan)
FOR LATE MAY DAILY MUSINGS, CLICK HERE
FOR MAY'S EIGHT DAYS IN A WEEK'S MUSINGS, CLICK HERE
FOR LATE APRIL LONDON MUSINGS, CLICK HERE
FOR EARLY APRIL MUSINGS, CLICK HERE


iJamming! Site Copyright Tony Fletcher 2003




SEARCH iJAMMING!
Enter search words here 

COMMENTS ON THIS PAGE OR ANYTHING ELSE IN iJAMMING!?
DISCUSS THEM IN THE PUB


This page last updated
Tue, Mar 2, 2004 1:55 pm)


WHAT'S NEW IN iJAMMING!...

FEATURED WINE REGION:
CÔTES DU RHÔNE-VILLAGES
updated and re-designed

The DECEMBER HITLIST
Bruce, Bowie, Iggy, Joe and Jodie...

From the Jamming! Archives
TONY PARSONS on BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN, 1984

THE IJAMMING! HITLIST:
Global Techtronica

FEATURED WINE:
Santa Julia Torrontes, Argentina

THE DECEMBER HITLIST Part 2
TRIPPED OUT BRITS: Nine albums of vaguely psychedelic bliss

FEATURED ALBUM:
Eargasm by Plump DJs

FEATURED WINE:
Paul Durdilly Les Grandes Coasses Beaujolais Nouveau 2003

THE DECEMBER HITLIST Part 1
BRITISH DANCE MUSIC:
Down But Not Out

THE OTHER NEW YORK MARATHON: 10 Live Reviews from the CMJ Music Marathon, October 2003

THE OCTOBER HITLIST:
Albums from UK, USA, Canada, Australia, Iceland, Denmark, New York and New Jersey.

NEW YORK W(H)INES:
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

DANCING IN THE DARK:
Bruce Springsteen at Shea Stadium

THE AUGUST HITLIST
What I bought on my Holidays (CDs, 12"s, books and magazines from the UK)

HEDONISM
What, Where, How and Why...

MANCHESTER MOVE MEMORIES:
A report from a proper Field Day Festival (includes R.E.M., The Charlatans, Inspiral Carpets, and Badly Drawn Boy)

THE JULY HITLIST:
10 NEW NEW YORK ALBUMS

THE JUNE HITLIST:
15 NEW ALBUMS
10 OLD ALBUMS
5 MOVIES

THE MAY HITLIST:
20 NEW ALBUMS,
1 ONLINE ESSENTIAL,
3 NEW MAGAZINES

FEATURED MIX CD:
2 CD's & MP3's

INSPIRAL CARPETS
live at the Brixton Academy

The iJamming! Interview:
2 MANY DJs
"We bypassed the record company and the industry - we just did this thing and it went off."

From the Jamming! Archives:
KILLING JOKE
interviewed in 1981

WHY I OPPOSE THE WAR
as of March 11

THE MARCH HITLIST:
5 SUPERB COMPILATIONS
20 ALBUMS, 5 EPs

THE FEBRUARY HITLIST:
25 ALBUMS

2002: THE YEAR IN REVIEW
Ten Major Memories and a number of lists

INTERPOL in concert

JOE STRUMMER: A TRIBUTE

THE DECEMBER HITLIST:
5 ALBUMS, EPs, MIX CDS, COMPILATIONS and SONGS

the iJamming! Book Review
WHY TERRORISM WORKS
by Alan Dershowitz

CABERNET FRANC
The 'Other' Cabernet Grape Takes Root In New York
Part 1: The Basics/Regions
Part 2: New York Wines
Part 3: Loire Wines
Part 4: Conclusions

THE NOVEMBER HITLIST
30 Albums 10 Songs

HOW MUCH WILL IT HURT?:
Tips for the marathon virgin.

From the Jamming! Archives:
THE JAM
Interviewed in 1979

The iJamming! Interview: UNDERWORLD
NOW WITH LIVE PHOTOS

Coming and Going
Chapter 3: THE PALACE

The iJamming! Interview
RICHARD BUTLER Part 2

From the Jamming! Archives:
ADAM ANT
Interviewed in 1978

REMARKS REMADE:
Available Now!
The introduction to the new edition of my R.E.M. biography is here.

A Decade In Dance
BT & BANCO DE GAIA
10 Years (Apiece)

2 MANY TASTINGS:
The iJamming! Wine Round Up October 2002, including:
Sauvignon Blanc
Chardonnay
Pinot Noir
Rhône Rangers
Southern France
Zinfandel

HALF MAN HALF BISCUIT
The whole 1990s catalogue

From the Jamming! Archives:
PAUL WELLER
interviewed in 1978

The iJamming! interview:
CARL COX

GOLDEN SHOT hostess 'Lee Patrick' recalls her time as Keith Moon's amour

From the Jamming! Archives:
U2 interviewed in 1984.

iJamming! Wino/Muso:
JOHN ACQUAVIVA

The iJAMMING! interview:
DAVID SYLVIAN

From the Keith Moon archives:
the JEFF BECK interview .

The iJAMMING! chat:
MARK PERRY

TRAVIS.
Fran Healy explains why "you cannot own a song."

From the JAMMING! archives: The Story That Spawned Creation

The iJAMMING! interview:
BOY GEORGE.

The biggest night out that you'll ever have in." Jockey Slut
"Hedonism will have you gripped from start to finish, guaranteed." International DJ


Tony Fletcher's debut novel HEDONISM is out now in the UK. For more information and to read excerpts, click here.

HEDONISM is now available for mail order in the States direct from iJamming! for just $20 including shipping and handling. Click on the PayPal button below. Please allow 7-10 days for delivery.

For rush delivery (3-4 days) HEDONISM is available for $25 including shipping and handling. Just click on the PayPal button below.

(Direct shipment for USA customers. Other countries use amazon.co.uk or musicroom.com)