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TONY FLETCHER'S NEXT DJ GIG IS AS GUEST AT TISWAS, DON HILL'S, GREENWICH AND SPRING STREETS, MANHATTAN, SATURDAY JANUARY 24. PERFORMING LIVE: AMBULANCE LTD. AND INOUK.

FRIDAY JANUARY 23

A BROOKLYN BRIDGE TOO FAR?

As any long-term sports fan will tell you, there's nothing in the world like having pride in your local team. As any long-term Brooklynite will tell you, there used to be nothing like having pride in the Brooklyn Dodgers – until the baseball team was sold, uprooted and moved out to Los Angeles, 2500 miles away, in 1957. Brooklyn went into economic and social freefall thereafter, which those same long-term local residents insist is not coincidental. Now that the borough's built itself back up, it may also regain a major sports team. On Wednesday, January 21, a $300,000,000 bid from real estate developers Forest Ratner was accepted by which basketball team the New Jersey Nets would be sold, uprooted and moved east…to Brooklyn, New York.

Astute readers will quickly recognize the inherent contradiction in the above apparent victory for Brooklyn sports fans. But believe me, gaining a 'local' team by buying someone else's 'local' team is the least of it. The proposed location for the something-or-others (they certainly won't be the New Jersey Anything any more) is a new indoor arena, designed by Frank Gehry, to be built as part of a $2.5 billion complex of offices, homes and stores on top of the Brooklyn Railyards, a quarter mile or so from my Park Slope home. This is the precise site the Dodgers tried to buy back in 1957, when their original Ebbets Field stadium was replaced by shabby public housing, at which time they were rebuffed by the city.

And yet, if there's some mild poetic justice in Dodgers fans getting their way a half century later – albeit with a second rate basketball team as opposed to a first rate baseball team – then there's the small matter of local opposition. To build the new complex, developer Bruce Ratner plans to knock down some old houses. And destroy some businesses. And remove some streets from the map. As you can imagine, many people are unhappy about this. To put it mildly.

Who wouldn't want to see this ...

...replaced by this?

I confess to currently sitting on the fence about this issue, which is likely to dominate all our borough news headlines for the next few months. And I'm writing here to get some thoughts out, to learn more in the process and wonder if we might not eventually get the best of all worlds.


First off, Bruce Ratner's interest in sports is minimal; he's a fiercely competitive commercial real estate developer with a reputation for running roughshod over all opposition, and when I've heard him interviewed on radio, he's come across more domineering than the worst of politicians. His $300,000,000 bid represents only 10% of the building budget for the proposed site, which will have significant public subsidies (i.e., from taxpayers like me). Ratner has had commercial successes over the years, but he's also erected some travesties, most notably the ugly, unpopular and largely under-utilized Atlantic Mall, which looks right over the proposed arena site. Perhaps he's hoping that no-one would dare oppose any building that blocks the Atlantic Mall from the skyline.

It's true that few would defend the state of the proposed site as it currently stands. The busy intersection of Flatbush and Atlantic Avenues has been a mess for years (not least, ironically, because almost every thing around it has been getting built on, from the Atlantic Mall, to Ratner's new Atlantic Commons, to the extensive subway station renovation), and the tracks themselves do nothing for the area's aesthetic appearance. In a bustling borough, where a once decrepit downtown and a formerly run-down brownstone district have each improved and expanded so rapidly over recent years that they're now meeting head-on, why not build over the last great lot of vacant land with something as economically empowering as a sports arena, along with its attendant housing, retail and office space? An optimist might even claim that with this vast enterprise in place, Brooklyn's resurrection would be complete.

...These people would be evicted and their homes bulldozed under the current plans.. Develop, don't destroy is their call-sign.

The arena as anticipated, dwarved by surrounding skyscrapers. The roof garden looks great; I wonder whether people would really be allowed to wonder around its parapet as in this diagram. (See full size pictures here.)

But then, if I owned one of the houses, co-ops, or businesses in the path of Ratner's bulldozers, I'd be pissed off. And of all the legitimate complaints against the enterprise, this is the one that resonates most strongly. Ratner plans to buy these people out of their homes 'at market value', which sounds all well and good but for the fact the homeowners are not being offered a choice in the matter. The city would exercise 'eminent domain' which basically means kicking residents out of their homes and reclaiming their land. As one such resident said on TV this morning, with a wry smile, doesn't that sound just a little, unAmerican?

Where do the politicians stand on all this? It depends on how many votes they have at stake, of course. Governor Pataki is staying relatively quiet; he doesn't want to be seen as gloating over rival state New Jersey's Net loss. Mayor Bloomberg is all for it, eminent domain issues included. Marty Markowitz, perhaps the biggest booster for Brooklyn the residents have ever elected to the office of Borough President, can barely contain his glee – until he's asked about displaced residents and businesses, at which point he's far more careful with his words. Closer to home, the community's directly elected State Senator Velma Montgomery and new City Councilmember Letitia Jones (the first Working Families candidate to be elected to City Office) are adamantly opposed to the plan.

Ratner cares little for personal popularity. (He reminds me of former Crystal Palace chairman and ongoing Selhurst Park landlord Ron Noades in many ways.) But he's shrewd, that's for sure. One of his partners in the $300,000,000 acquisition is Jay-Z. There's your urban black youth vote sewn up. Another partner is Vincent Viola, chairman of the New York Mercantile Exchange. There's your white collar banking vote sewn up. With supposed Brooklyn everyman Markowitz also on board, the only people speaking up for the middle class residents and self-employed business owners are themselves, which is why they're making so much damned noise. Patti Hagan, a leader of the Prospect Heights Action Coalition, claims 864 people would lose their homes and 237 people their jobs in the demolition. Ratner claims only 100 people will be forced out. That's a large disparity, but placed alongside the other figures involved – a 19,000 seat arena, six acres of publicly accessible open space, 4,400,000 square feet for approximately 4,500 units of mixed income housing, 2,100,000 square feet for commercial office space, 300,000 square feet for retail space and 3,000 parking spaces – it may be considered irrelevant.

I have reasons to be opposed to the plan. I have an inherent, well-founded distrust of Ratner, I'm certain that taxpayers will end up funding much of the purchase and the building costs, and I don't see why the complex involves so many skyscrapers, so much damn office and retail space as well as the supposedly affordable housing. (Nor do I place much trust in the notion that 'affordable seating' will be held back for local residents attending the games.) I absolutely despise the idea of people being forcibly displaced from their own land, especially when they've done so much to improve the neighborhood. I'm frightened at seeing so much traffic close to my own home, and I'm concerned that 5th Avenue, which currently extends to Atlantic Avenue, would now end at Flatbush.

However, I don't think traffic is the biggest issue here: as with Madison Square Garden, which functions perfectly well in the heart of Manhattan, the arena would sit atop of a massive subway junction and train terminal, the biggest in the Borough; add in the 3,000 parking spaces for those who would still insist on driving up the three major Avenues from five different directions, and we might hope that the neighborhood will not be choked on game nights.

On the positive side, as with what looks like the majority of Brooklyn residents, I genuinely like the idea of so much currently dead and unattractive space being turned into a viable, thriving center for sports. (And music. Every basketball arena in the nation doubles up as a concert hall. Those who like arena concerts would soon be spoiled for choice.) And of course I love the notion that Brooklynites might have a team to cheer on again. Especially a basketball team. Because while the baseball diamond may be considered the field of dreams, basketball is the sport of city courts.

Mayor Bloomberg, Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz and developer Bruce Ratner gloating at the unveiling of the plans. Note Jay-Z behind them: the rapper would be a financial partner in the new sports team.

The street in the foreground and the train tracks in the middle would be built over for the complex. So would the houses behind the camera. Some critics suggest that Ratner should build over the Atlantic Mall on the other side of the street instead (see Office Max). Ratner has also built the new office block going up behind the Mall.

But the issue of local residents and businesses will have to be resolved for this to move ahead successfully. There's no reason a compromise can't be found. Look at the plans for the rebuilding of the World Trade Center, which have been constantly updated and amended to take care of all manner of political and commercial considerations. A similar return to the drawing board should take place here. At the very least, Ratner's plans should be scaled down to allow those on Pacific and Dean Streets to hold on to their property. If Ratner really needs every inch of possible space to realize his plans, he should take a second look at his own Atlantic Mall, on the other side of the Avenue from the streets he wants to condemn. Why can't he evict himself and build over his own (admitted) aesthetic failure if he really wants to make amends?

That just leaves the Nets fans. How do they feel about being shafted the way the Dodgers were almost fifty years ago? It's hard to know. There aren't that many of them. (The Nets have the second-lowest average attendance in the nation.) And there's a good reason for that. The Nets currently play at the Meadowlands complex, alongside Giants Stadium, which was built over swampland. Outside the complex itself, there are no residents or shops within miles. None to complain about the noise and the traffic and the upheaval, and none to walk round the corner and catch the games.

LINKS
FOREST RATNER
BOROUGH PRESIDENT MARTY MARKOWITZ STATEMENT
NO STADIUM.HOMESTEAD.COM
BBALL WEB SITE (with pictures of intended site)
THE WORKING FAMILIES PARTY


THURSDAY JANUARY 22

HEDONISM COMES HOME

Hedonism: Now available in the States through Barnes and Noble.

My debut novel Hedonism was published in the UK last summer. It's sold well, got excellent reviews and had some very positive reader feedback. But while I'm flattered by all that, distribution of Hedonism in New York City, where the story is actually set, has always been of utmost importance. So I'm pleased to announce that Hedonism is now available in the States through Barnes and Noble. You can buy it online through the company's well-organized web site, and find it in select New York City Barnes and Noble stores. The online price is $18, and the store price should be $20, each of which matches up nicely with the UK price of £10. Any store that doesn’t have Hedonism in stock should be able to order it through the company's internal system; the web site offers same day delivery in Manhattan and next day delivery to 'select East Coast Zip Codes'... Although I would imagine that after waiting this long, you won't mind if it takes a few days to reach your doorstep should you be ordering it from California or Arizona.

I'll keep the direct sales going from the iJamming! site for the time being, for those of you with a paypal account who prefer buying direct from the source. (The book is also available at a handful of independent New York stores, listed here.) I don't know if it's a bonus or not, but copies ordered from iJamming! will be signed by the author.

And while I know that regular readers of the site have endured much promotion of Hedonism, I have to warn you it's probably just beginning as concerns the States. After the book's UK publication, I did but three readings here in New York in the Autumn, just one of those in Manhattan. Now that the novel is actually available here, I plan on lining up others. Maybe even a proper launch party. Watch this space. (As if you have a choice.)

In fact, by timely coincidence, and adding to the positive press in Time Out NY and the Village Voice, this interview with me has just been published at the Suicide Girls web site. I'm in good company: other recent interviewees in the 'Words' section include Karl Hyde, Martin Amis and William H. Macy. I'm in even better company with the Suicide Girls themselves, any one of whom could surely cast themselves as Monkey when Hedonism becomes a movie.


The above picture may or may not have a connection with a certain fictional venue mentioned in Hedonism; my thanks anyway to DJ Shaggy for sending it my way and asking the question. You can find more pictures of the Melody at Shaggy's web site. The pictures were taken in December. The New Brunswick venue has long been closed down, and Shaggy got in while it was being cleared of asbestos. (Asbestos! Now they tell us!) It has since, we are told, been fully demolished. I know there are regular visitors to this site who were also regular visitors to the Melody. Anybody want to start reminiscing in the Pub?


WEDNESDAY JANUARY 21

SOMEBODY'S GOT THE GOODS

Available on 12" only, LCD Soundsystem's new single 'Yeah' not only delivers on the promise of its predecessors, the hipster-baiting 12" 'Losing My Edge' and the riotous Fall-like indie rock 7" 'Give It Up'. It not only captures the incessant energy of the vibrant live show. 'Yeah' single-handedly raises the standard of the whole New York dance-rock crossover scene.

It does so primarily by issuing a verbal challenge to that scene. "Everybody keeps on talking about it, nobody's getting it done," laments James Murphy early on to a relatively lazy indie-funk groove propelled largely by his own sly bass runs. But as Murphy's language grows ever more combative ("Everybody keeps on pushing and shoving, nobody's got the goods"), so the backing track rises in volume and aggression until, halfway through the nine-minute work-out, the deliberately tired choruses of "yeah yeah yeahs" are drowned out by a roaring acid synth copped from the Underworld sound system. (Murphy's DFA production partner Tim Goldworthy apparently 'rocked those acid breaks'; otherwise, and with the exception of the barely audible guest vocalist Nancy Whang, the label insists that the recordings are '100% Murphy.' This is quite some achievement: the bass and keyboard lines would be the envy of many a session musician.)

LCD Soundystem at the Bowery Ballroom in October. James Murphy, at right, played almost everything on 'Yeah.'

There's no more lyrics once the synth kicks in, leading to any listener's likely conclusion that, rather than "talking about it," LCD is now "getting it done." This is arrogance in the extreme, yet fully justified for the simple fact that Murphy pulls it off: 'Yeah's lengthy conclusion, a furious battle between live drums, filtered analogue synths, and cowbells, is the most exhilarating five minutes of indie dance since The Rapture's 'House of Jealous Lovers.' Which, of course, Murphy co-produced.

Only time will tell if 'Yeah' proves equally influential on the global dancefloor. 'Losing My Edge' was too knowingly self-conscious for most DJs (and their audience), and as a further comment on its own scene, 'Yeah' may also meet resistance from both sides of the turntables. Nor is it as joyously dumb as 'Jealous Lovers'; 'Yeah' demands your attention, at least for the verses. That's not to say it takes itself too seriously: the vocal mix is labeled 'Crass', the lengthy live instrumental b-side jam, a thrilling roller-coaster ride in its own right (think 'Papa Meets A Brand New Pigbag' wrestling with 'Plastic Dreams') is called 'Pretentious.'

There's also a bonus, near a capella version of the chorus vocals, complete with audible coughing and instrumental bleed from the singers' headphones. With its out-of-tune repetitive "yeahs" and a few "heys" it seems to be quietly laughing at itself. Who, you instantly wonder, would ever be daft enough to mix this a capella on the dancefloor? (A question which will surely be answered soon enough.)

There will, hopefully, be better singles come out of the New York scene in 2004. That's clearly the point of 'Yeah's carefully timed, January release: to set the agenda for the coming twelve months. In that sense it's a throwdown in classic hip hop tradition. But the throwdown is not to the city's rappers. It's to the trust fund East Village indie kids, the Hedonistic house nation and the Billyburg hipsters alike. The only question, as 'Yeah' hopefully sweeps the dancefloors of New York City and beyond, is this: Who dares respond?

(You can here part of 'Yeah' at the DFA web site, where the 'Pretentious' mix is labeled as 'Stupid'. But be aware that the song's selling point is its full journey, from tired indie complaint to exhilarating dancefloor work-out. You wanna hear the song in action, and see the audience reaction, come to Tiswas on Saturday, where I'll be spinning the post-bands' set.)


TUESDAY JANUARY 20

WHAT'S THE FOOTBALL EQUIVALENT OF A MONDAY MORNING QUARTERBACK?

What do Crystal Palace and Crazy Legs United have in common? (Apart from a cr-ispy name, of course.) Well, they both scored five goals this weekend. Unfortunately, while Palace only let in one (shurely shome mishtake? Palace winning 5-1?), Crazy Legs let in eight. This is the first time in three games this season our over-30s 5-a-side team has kept our opponents down to single figures, so clearly, like Palace, we're improving, right? Right?

As any season-long football fan knows – and as any marathon runner can tell you from experience – a strong start can easily turn sour, just as a disappointing beginning to a season or a long race can give way to a thrilling finish. So, I've learned from living in America all these years not to place too much credence in the first Presidential Primary. Only 100,000 people or so voted yesterday in Iowa, just one state among an eventual fifty, and with only a 50% recent success rate in choosing the eventual Democratic candidate. Still, it's hard not to be seriously surprised by the result: supposed has-been John Kerry and apparent nobody John Edwards each beating out declared front-runner Howard Dean by a ratio of around 2-1. Anyway which way you look at it, that was a resounding defeat for Dean.

There are people who are paid a full-time wage to analyze this stuff, so I'll be brief...then again, given that these full-time pundits predicted an easy Dean victory, all of us should feel equally qualified to comment. For my part, I'm sure that the almost omnipresent coverage on Dean has had a negative effect (the quantity of that coverage just as much as its qualitive references to his temper, arrogance and 'unelectability'). In addition, the seasoned rural voters of Iowa were clearly unimpressed by either Dean's army of out-of-State young campaigners, nor by his many endorsements, from Al Gore on down. We should, at the very least, give these voters credit for making up their own minds.

A couple of supposed statistics, gleaned from this morning's Brian Lehrer show, paint a more informative picture. Kerry won not just among veteran voters (the over 60s) but also among the under 30s, polling around 35% to Dean's 25%; so much for Dean's runaway support among the youth. Dean fared strongly on the issue of Iraq, which we all know has been and continues to be a lightning rod for the left-wing; however, Iraq was considered the 'most important issue' by only 14% of Iowa voters. If that wasn't enough to win a Democratic Primary, it surely won't be a deciding factor in the Presidential Election either. (Especially if, and I think this is likely, a majority of that 14 or so per cent around the country turn out to support the war.) A far bigger issue among Democratic voters, and not without reason, was that of health care; those people voted predominately for Kerry.

The Tuesday morning quarterback question then, is this: Is Howard Dean merely at the start of his marathon/season? Or, considering for how long he's dominated news and been considered the front-runner, is he in fact already at the end of it?



The above paragraph started with a classic American saying. My use of it was deliberate. When it comes to pleasantly garbled Transatlantic speech, however, you'd be hard put to beat this line from the Postal Service song 'Clark Gable': "I was waiting for a cross town train on the London Underground." Love it.

Not too late to say you heard them first: The Postal Service album Give Up...

...And TV On The Radio's official release Young Liars. Sadly, no fucking Robots....

Love the whole album...I was turned on to the Postal Service in part by their high showing in some end of year writers' polls, in part by their appearance in some iJamming! readers' Best-Ofs, and then emphatically by the music I downloaded for free. (And have since paid for.) I was turned on to the (not Kraftwerk) song 'Robots' by searching Limewire for TV On The Radio music for similar reasons. I then got confused about who actually recorded the track, given that it didn't show on any web searches or official releases. Thanks very much to JunoSwift for popping into the Pub and clarifying that 'Robots' is indeed by TV On The Radio, part of a limited edition release sold at gigs in 2002 to those more clued into the Brooklyn Subway System (i.e. Underground) than myself. My local venue Southpaw is hosting the official release gig for TV On The Radio's new album on March 9th. Remember, it's never too late to say 'I was there early on…'

A question for those who disapprove of all file-sharing. If only 300 copies of an album – let's say, OK Calculator by TV On The Radio, on which 'Robots' first appeared - are released, is it a moral crime to make that record available as MP3s to others? Is it a moral crime to then download those tracks for free? Especially if, in both cases, the result is to attract more fans to the band, improving their gig attendance, future record sales and, as proven here, press coverage in the process? Clearly, if the album was 'hand-printed' as JunoSwift tells us in the case of OK Calculator, those initial 300 copies not only maintain their exclusivity; their resale value actually increases as word spreads on the artist. In this case, I see it as a win-win situation.

Mid-eighties Brit band Faith Brothers' two albums have long been out of print and have never been available in digital form. This obviously renders them exclusive in the extreme, but that's not the point of making music in the first place. Which is surely why singer, songwriter and front man Billy Franks has placed them on his web site for free download. A couple of months back I gave heads up to online release of the first Faith Brothers album Eventide; now the second album, A Human Sound, has been digitalized as a Zip file. Should you feel any guilt at downloading this music for free, you can click on the paypal button and reward him with some no-middle-man royalties. You can, of course, do the same thing here for all the words written at iJamming! for the primary joy of sharing them. Have a good week.

2004 MUSINGS
JAN 12-18: The Unicorns live, New York w(h)ines, Sex In The City, Curb Your Enthusiasm, S.U.V. Safety, Bands Reunited
JAN 5-11: Tony's Top 10s of 2003, Howard Dean and his credits, Mick Middles and Mark E. Smith, Mick Jones and Don Letts,

2003 MUSINGS:
DEC 22-JAN 4: Blind Boys of Alabama live, Joe Strummer, Year-End Lists, Finding Nemo, The Return of The King
DEC 15-21: Placebo live, Park Slope, Angels In America, Saddam's capture
DEC 8-14: The Rapture live, Guardian readers change lightbulbs, Keep iJamming! Thriving
DEC 1-7: Cabaret Laws, Ready Brek, Kinky Friedman, Sir Ranulph Fiennes, Jonathan Lethem, Julie Burchill, Blizzard running
NOV 17-30: Lost In Music, Lost In Translation, Neil Boland, Political Polls, Press Clips, Australian Whines
NOV 10-16: Ben E. King live, Hedonism readings, A***nal, Charts on Fire
NOV 3-9: Brother Bear, Oneida, P. Diddy, Steve Kember, Guy Fawkes, Iraq, the Marathon
OCT 27-NOV 2: CMJ Music Marathon report, NYC Running Marathon preview, Prey For Rock'n'Roll, Yellow Dog, Gen Wesley Clark, Halloween
OCT 20-26: Television Personalities, defending New York rockers, Bill Drummond Is Read
OCT 6-19: LCD Soundsystem live, Renewable Brooklyn review, Blind Acceptance is a sign...
SEP29-OCT 5: New York w(h)ines parts 1 and 2, Bruce Springsteen at Shea Stadium.
SEP 22-28: Atlantic Antic, Pacifists for War: General Wesley Clark and the Democratic Debate, Danny Tenaglia, Running Wild, Steppenwolf
SEP 15-21: Radio 4/DJ Vadim live, Manhattan Mondaze, Circle of Light, Renewable Brooklyn
SEP 8-14: Central Park Film Festival, Roger (Daltrey) and me, September 11 Revisited, The Raveonettes/Stellastarr* live, Recording Idiots of America,
SEP1-7: Film Festivities, Party Monster, Keith Moon RIP
AUG 25-31: Punk Planet, Carlsonics, Copyright Protection, Cline Zinfandel, BRMC
AUG 18-24: Black Out Blame Game, John Shuttleworth, British Music mags, Greg Palast, The Thrills live.
AUG 11-17: The New York blackout, Restaurant reviews, The Media as Watchdog, What I Bought On My Holidays
AUG 4-10: Step On again, Shaun W. Ryder, Jack magazine, the BBC, the Weather, Detroit Cobras, football and Rock'n'Roll
JULY 28-AUG 3: De La Guarda, The Rapture, Radio 4, Stellastarr*, Jodie Marsh, A Tale of Two Lions, Hedonism launch photos,
JULY 14-27: Manchester Move Memories, Hedonism is Here, Holiday postcard
JULY 7-13: Chuck Jackson live, Step On, Beverley Beat, British Way of Life
JUNE30-JULY6: David Beckham, Geoffrey Armes, Happy Mondays, Step On at Royale
JUNE 23-29: Ceasars/The Realistics live, weddings and anniversaries, Cabaret laws.
JUNE 9-23: Hell W10, The Clash, Big Audio Dynamite, Nada Surf live, Field Day debacle
JUNE 2-8: Six Feet Under - Over, Field Day, Siren Fest, Crouching Tigher Hidden Cigarette
MAY 19-JUNE 1: Ian McCulloch live, New York's financial woes, Six Feet Under, Hedonism, Tommy Guerrero.
MAY 5-18: Live reviews of The Rapture, De La Soul, Carlsonics, Laptop, The Libertines, Echoboy, The Greenhornes; observations on Chris Coco/The Blue Room, The Apple Music Store, Alan Freed, Phil Spector, The Matrix Reloaded, Rare Earth, Tinnitus and Royale!
APRIL 28-MAY 4: Flaming Lips, Madonna, Bill Maher, The Dixie Chicks, the war
APRIL 21-27: Rotary Connection, War(n) Out, Cocaine Talk
APRIL 14-20: Belated London Musings on Death Disco and CPFC.
APRIL 7-13: London Musings: Madness, Inspiral Carpets, the Affair, the Palace, the Jam
MARCH 31-APRIL 6: Music be the spice of life, London Calling: Ten Observations from the Old Country
MARCH 24-30: Six Feet Under, Peaches/Elefant live, MP Frees and Busted Boy Bands
MARCH 17-23: Röyksopp live, Transmission, Worn-Out War Talk
MARCH 10-16: Live reviews: Stratford 4, Flaming Sideburns, Joe Jackson Band, Linkin Park. Why I Oppose The War (For Now).
MARCH 3-9: The Pursuit of Happiness, Weekend Players, U.S. Bombs, Al Farooq, A New Pessimism, Brooklyn Half Marathon
FEBRUARY 24-MARCH2: Orange Park, Ali G-Saddam Hussein-Dan Rather-Bill Maher-Jon Stewart TV reviews, Stellastarr*, James Murphy, The Station nightclub fire, the Grammys
FEBRUARY 17-23: Village Voice Poll, Singles Club, Smoke and Fire
FEBRUARY 3-16: Snug, The Face, Pink, Supergrass live, Keith Moon, Phil Spector, Gore Vidal
JANUARY 27-FEBRUARY 2: Communist Chic, Spiritland, Daddy You're A Hero, Keith Moon, State of the Union, CPFC and more on Iraq
JANUARY 20-26: Divisions of Laura Lee, Burning Brides, Words On War, Child Abuse of a Different Kind, Losing My Edge
JANUARY 13-19: Pete Townshend, Pee Wee Herman, South Park and more Pete Townshend
JANUARY 6-12: Interpol in concert, Tony Fletcher's Top 10 Albums and Singles of 2002, More on Joe Strummer and The Clash, Fever Pitch and Bend It Like Beckham.
DECEMBER 31 2002 -JAN 5 2003: A tribute to Joe Strummer, Radio 4 live on New Year's Eve
2002 MUSINGS ARE LISTED HERE:


iJamming! Site Copyright Tony Fletcher 2003




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Ten Major Memories and a number of lists

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The 'Other' Cabernet Grape Takes Root In New York
Part 1: The Basics/Regions
Part 2: New York Wines
Part 3: Loire Wines
Part 4: Conclusions

THE NOVEMBER HITLIST
30 Albums 10 Songs

HOW MUCH WILL IT HURT?:
Tips for the marathon virgin.

From the Jamming! Archives:
THE JAM
Interviewed in 1979

The iJamming! Interview: UNDERWORLD
NOW WITH LIVE PHOTOS

Coming and Going
Chapter 3: THE PALACE

The iJamming! Interview
RICHARD BUTLER Part 2

From the Jamming! Archives:
ADAM ANT
Interviewed in 1978

REMARKS REMADE:
Available Now!
The introduction to the new edition of my R.E.M. biography is here.

A Decade In Dance
BT & BANCO DE GAIA
10 Years (Apiece)

2 MANY TASTINGS:
The iJamming! Wine Round Up October 2002, including:
Sauvignon Blanc
Chardonnay
Pinot Noir
Rhône Rangers
Southern France
Zinfandel

HALF MAN HALF BISCUIT
The whole 1990s catalogue

From the Jamming! Archives:
PAUL WELLER
interviewed in 1978

The iJamming! interview:
CARL COX

GOLDEN SHOT hostess 'Lee Patrick' recalls her time as Keith Moon's amour

From the Jamming! Archives:
U2 interviewed in 1984.

iJamming! Wino/Muso:
JOHN ACQUAVIVA

The iJAMMING! interview:
DAVID SYLVIAN

From the Keith Moon archives:
the JEFF BECK interview .

The iJAMMING! chat:
MARK PERRY

TRAVIS.
Fran Healy explains why "you cannot own a song."

From the JAMMING! archives: The Story That Spawned Creation

The iJAMMING! interview:
BOY GEORGE.

The biggest night out that you'll ever have in." Jockey Slut
"Hedonism will have you gripped from start to finish, guaranteed." International DJ


Tony Fletcher's debut novel HEDONISM is out now in the UK. For more information and to read excerpts, click here.

HEDONISM is now available for mail order in the States direct from iJamming! for just $20 including shipping and handling. Click on the PayPal button below. Please allow 7-10 days for delivery.

For rush delivery (3-4 days) HEDONISM is available for $25 including shipping and handling. Just click on the PayPal button below.

(Direct shipment for USA customers. Other countries use amazon.co.uk or musicroom.com)