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author, journalist and dee jay Tony Fletcher.
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STEP ON STEPS DOWN!
FRIDAY DECEMBER 3

The final Step On monthly party takes place on FRIDAY DECEMBER 3. Yes, we're sad about it too.

But we're waving goodbye to our Madchester revival night in style. Joining Tony Fletcher and (hopefully, considering her advanced state of pregnancy), Ms. Posie on the decks will be Jeff Smith, flying in from Manchester itself, where he's a core DJ at the Poptastic night among others.

We're also thrilled to host the return of New York's own Dan Selzer, who has a perfect collection of Factory Funk classics and knows how to spin them. Desko 2000 will be opening the night. Other friends will be dropping by begging to play. We hope to open the downstairs room to accommodate everyone. We will have an open beer bar at 9pm – so Joe has promised me. And we will be raffling off at least a couple of our beloved Madchester posters as our way of saying thanks for your support these past 18 months.

Step On down to The Royale, Friday December 3, 506 5th Avenue, between 12th and 13th Street, Park Slope, Brooklyn. Music and bar specials kick in at 9pm. This final night, we rock till you drop.

Want to know what makes Step On special? Click on these pictures from our previous parties for more pictures from more previous parties.

FRIDAY NOVEMBER 26

THE WEEKEND REVIEW

NICK CAVE & THE BAD SEEDS
ABATTOIR BLUES/THE LYRE OF OPHEUS
(Mute/Anti)

Neither the passing of the years nor the departure of long-term band member Blixa Bargeld can slow Nick Cave, whose output appears to be picking up at the very point most other artists in their mid-40s slows down. Fortunately, quality is not being sacrificed here for quantity. Less a double album than two individual albums released within the same package, Abattoir Blues and The Lyre Of Orpheus find Cave and his Bad Seeds scaling new career heights across all spectrums: music, lyrics and performance.

The strength of the songs lies in a newly defined sense of purpose that even included the occasional formal rehearsal. The vitality of the actual recordings lies in their origins: Paris in spring, in an old analogue studio formerly used by such greats as Nina Simone and Serge Gainsbourg, with producer Nick Launey capturing proceedings as spontaneously as possible. (Cave himself was recorded playing piano and singing live simultaneously.)

Abattoir Blues is the more rambunctious, sprawling and verbose of the two albums, thanks in part to the aggressive drumming of Jim Sclavunos. Calling cards include 'Hiding All Away,' a lengthy, dirty blues jam reminiscent of Cave and guitarist Mick Harvey's early 80s noise merchants The Birthday Party at their pinnacle; 'There She Goes, My Beautiful World,' a lengthy roll call of artistic fuck-ups (from Nabakov to Johnny Thunders and Karl Marx); and 'Let The Bells Ring,' a poetic tribute to the late great Johnny Cash, including the apparently straight-faced couplet "There are those of us not fit to tie the laces of your shoes." The Lyre of Orpheus is altogether more restrained (such things being relative in Nick Cave's world), thanks to a different drummer, Thomas Wydler, playing with a much lighter touch. Less outstanding lyrically, it's also a little easier on the ears, with 'Easy Money' and the grand finale 'O Children' both Bad Seeds ballads to treasure. The London Gospel Community Choir, who've been gracing white peoples' records since Madness' 'Wings Of A Dove,' show up on at least half the songs to add the necessary dose of earnest spirituality.
Abattoir Blues: A-
The Lyre Of Orpheus: B+

Highlight: At odds with the rest of Abattoir Blues, 'Nature Boy' is a pure pop song, written in homage to Steve Harley's 'Come Up And See Me' though reminiscent to my own ears of Hothouse Flowers and their early career classic, 'Don't Go.' Grand piano lines accompany an exhortation of ethereal beauty – "she moves in the shadows" - set to the most conventional female backing vocals Cave has ever endorsed.
Quote: "I see myself, more or less, as a comic writer these days."
Web Site: nickcaveandthebadseeds.com
Free Download: No MP3s at the nick cave site, but plenty videos to view online, at least as far back as 'The Ship Song' at which time Cave was only "a month out of the clinic." Which reminds me: Cave is still the only interview subject who's ever fallen asleep on me!
Wine? An iconoclastic Aussie is an obvious choice: Charles Melton's genre-busting, hedonistic Rosé Of Virginia will surely do the trick. But considering that these albums were recorded in Paris, you may want to drink French, in which case head down south to the warm climate of the Rhône and get lost inside a heady, rustic red. The 2001 Domaine Roger Perrin Châteauneuf du Pape is as fine a choice as any.

THURSDAY NOVEMBER 25

HAPPY THANKSGIVING

Back tomorrow.


WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 24

"I LIVE FOR THE GIRLS, THE CLUBS, THE NIGHT, THE MUSIC AND THE WINE"

It's Thanksgiving, that time of year when those who don't normally drink wine seek advice on what to pour with their Holiday Meal, and those of us who drink it frequently get cocky offering amateur expertise. For me, having jumped back into the sport of wine drinking with a vengeance after a lengthy abstention for the Marathon, Thanksgiving provides an opportunity to focus on American wines for this very American holiday.


TERNHAVEN CELLARS CABERNET SAUVIGNON 1998, NORTH FORK, LONG ISLAND

I chose this wine for my reintroduction to the world of wine because of its low alcohol – a mere 12% - and because I've been pleasantly surprised by this miniscule Long Island winery in the past. Unlike most offerings from a region whose reds are usually over-priced and over-soaked, this Ternhaven Cabernet Sauvignon completely belied the two years it apparently spent maturing in small oak casks. It probably helped that I had given it another three years' maturation in the home cellar. But it was obviously well made to begin with. Either way, a nose of bright strawberry and blackcurrant fruits mixed in with a hint of mint; on the palate, that cheery fruit was accompanied an impressive Bordeaux-like astringency; the finish lingered just long enough to leave me gasping for more. I was atypically patient, and held off for 24 hours, at which I poured the bulk of the bottle to open up an all-American wine night for visiting English friends, who were greatly impressed. The wines of Harold Watts's boutique operation are not easy to find – Ternhaven is the smallest winery on the North Fork, to best of my knowledge – but they're well worth seeking out. At only $14, this Cabernet is a reason to maintain faith in an otherwise underperforming New York region.
B


OSPREY'S DOMINION CABERNET SAUVIGNON RESERVE, NORTH FORK, LONG ISLAND 2000

A week later, a stranger showed up at someone else's dinner do, swinging two full bottles of this stuff, and I initially recoiled: Osprey's Dominion are responsible for the worst white wine I have ever tasted from Long Island. Maybe they should just stick to the reds, for this Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon is, if neither so subtle nor distinctive as the Ternhaven, certainly difficult to dislike. It offers up an extremely alluring aroma of mint and chocolate, with a dollop of sweet oak on the palate that just avoids overpowering its considerable quantity of juicy ripe fruit. It's what you call an obvious crowd-pleaser – except for the price, which, I have just noticed at the company's web site, is a whopping $35. See what I mean about Long Island wines being over-priced?
B


RIDGE CALIFORNIA PASO ROBLES ZINFANDEL 2001

Ridge wines come in distinctive labels...

...with copious notes on the rear.

Back to my own, all-American wine dinner the week after the Marathon. As I told my English guests, Ridge's Paul Draper is widely revered as America's greatest wine maker, and Zinfandel is considered America's greatest – or at least the country's most indigenous - grape. This Paso Robles Zinfandel is everything you would hope for from that combination. It explodes out of the bottle with an aroma of ultra-ripe wild fruit flavors – think of those unusual jams/jellies made of boysenberries and Lincolnberries and others you know for being exotic even if you don't know them by taste – wrapped inside a solid wall of dense licorice. The wine introduces itself on the palate with a bright, tongue-sapping acidity, settles in to wrap a big fat wall of fruit on the cheeks, and then hangs around for a long, spicy, intense finish. Though the wine is enormous, it's perfectly balanced: you wouldn't know it's 14.5% alcohol without checking the label. And while, at $25, it's proof that quality does not always come cheap, this Ridge may replace the ever-reliable Seghesio as my wine of choice when looking to show off Zinfandel to overseas visitors unfamiliar with the grape. Ridge makes good wines across the board, and some of its Zinfandel-based blends are even more approachable (financially and on the palate), but anyone looking for the archetypal American wine for Thanksgiving dinner need go no further.
A-


YAMHILL VALLEY VINEYARDS PINOT NOIR, WILLIAMETTE VALLEY, OREGON 1999

Not all wines live up to reputation. Oregon is touted by many as the best source in America for Pinot Noir; the Williamette Valley is considered that State's best region; 1999 was hailed as an excellent vintage. But despite considerable tannin deposit in the bottle, and for all that it was decanted a couple of hours before dinner, this Yamhill Valley Vineyards Pinot Noir was surprisingly muted. Don't get me wrong: there were distinct varietal notes of cherry, earth, and spice, and a lovely dustiness that carried over into the palate, but the wine was more austere than I had hoped, and yet without the secondary flavors on anticipates with bottle age. Could it just have been in a 'closed' stage? Possibly, but Oregon hasn't yet established the reputation to warrant yet longer term cellaring. The next Williamette Valley wine I buy I'll drink young.
B-


BABCOCK PINOT NOIR TRI-COUNTIES CUVÉE, CALIFORNIA 2002

The beautiful Babcock Tri-Counties gives 104%.

You've heard of the sports team that gives 110%? Well, meet the wine that gives 104%: David Babcock's Tri-Counties Cuvée Pinot Noir somehow includes 75% Santa Barbara grapes, 19% Monterey County and 10% Sonoma County. Fortunately, the wine acts like it's carrying that extra 4%. A pretty and vibrant dark red color in the glass, it's full of bright but delicate cherry flavors with all manner of floral accompaniment. They're an obvious enticement to get stuck into the wine itself, yet they're also something of a tease, inviting us to sit back and enjoy the anticipation a little longer. Fortunately, the body is as sensual as the smell, from first kiss on the lips to lingering aftertaste. It enters cleanly, with more of that bing cherry aroma; it fills out nicely on the inside, showing some density that suggests you could hold it a few years without worry, and deposits just a hint of chocolate as it disappears down the throat. It then hangs around on the palate for ages, like a perfect new partner who stays in bed for cuddles after copulation. Can a wine truly be compared to a lover? Maybe not, but after a sip of the Babcock, you'll understand why Pinot Noir is often described as the most 'sexy' of grapes. (And, conversely, why it's also described as the most 'finicky' and 'unreliable'!)

I've been through two bottles of this wine over two periods separated by several months: in each case, people I've shared it with (some of them the kind who rarely pause to note what wine they're drinking) have instantly perked up and proclaimed its brilliance. The good news? The Tri-Counties Cuvée is inexpensive. I paid $18 for this in New York City, where it's a struggle to find decent Burgundy Pinot Noir for twice that price. The bad news? Well, Babcock only makes 20,000 cases in total, of some 17 or more different labels. If I've read the web site correctly, the 2003 Tri-Counties is only available to members of the New Release Program. (And if you live in one of the many States that STILL forbids intra-State Internet purchases, like New York and New Jersey, you won't be able to buy it that way anyway.) If you live in Brooklyn though – and I know a few of you do – pay a visit to that wonderful Seventh Avenue store, Big Nose Full Body, and pick up a bottle or two. If you don't share my enthusiasm, I'll happily relieve you of the remainder!
A-


CASTLE ROCK PINOT NOIR RUSSIAN RIVER VALLEY 2002

The Russian River Valley is rapidly turning into my favorite wine region in the States. With its morning fogs and comparatively cool temperatures, it allows for an intensity of flavor and restraint in alcohol, and has become a benchmark region for Californian Pinot Noir and well-balanced Zinfandels. Class does not come cheap, however, which is why this bottle from Castle Rock seems like a double-edged sword. Great, it's a mere $10. But at such a low price, can it be any good?

That depends what you compare it to. Tasted on its own (as when I first came across it, at Long Tan, a 5th Ave, Brooklyn, Thai-Australian restaurant that doubles as a chic bar), it's distinctive to the varietal, with that typical cherry aroma (though of a darker kind than the delicate Babcock), and some of the mushroom and earth that comes with rustic Pinot Noirs. It's quite big and aggressive, but as a bar wine, a party wine, or an everyday quaffer with a hearty red wine meal, you can't go wrong for the price.

But recently, I brought my own bottle to a new 5th Ave, currently unlicensed, restaurant, Peperoncino, and opened it up straight after we polished off the Babcock. It was like comparing Oasis to The Beatles. One friend commented that the alcohol was more obtrusive in the Castle Rock (as it's a touch lower in content, 13.5 as compared to the Babcock's 13.8%, that means it’s actually less balanced), and the other noted that it was more bitter to the taste. I just observed that it felt bigger, less subtle, more powerful than its Tri-Counties rival. If we persist with the notion of Pinot Noir as a partner, this one's good for a quick shag – but the kind you might hope would NOT stick around for the night!

It was unfair perhaps to compare these wines: wines should always be reviewed according to price, and it's never a good idea to work down the quality scale over the course of an evening. But still, the message is clear. If the Castle Rock is a bargain (and it is), then the Babcock, even at a few dollars more, is an absolute steal. Who, after all, would take Oasis home for the night when they could bed a Beatle?
B-


TUESDAY NOVEMBER 23

U2 MANIA!

You know, I try. I really do. Sometimes I go upstate and lock myself away from the world to get on with writing; and yesterday, after my early morning post, I set off to the Library to do likewise. The library was closed, however, so I settled for Ozzies (Coffee Hang-out/Would Be Novelists Shop) on 5th Avenue. I was greatly taken by the fact that the server was playing The Futureheads album – way to start a Monday morning! – but I shouldn't have got into a conversation with him about it. Because the next thing I find out is that U2 are playing a free concert under the Brooklyn Bridge – on the Brooklyn side, I hasten to add – later this same day as part of the launch for their new album How To Dismantle An Atom Bomb.

I did the right thing. I stayed at Ozzie's and worked all day, ignoring e-mail, the mobile phone, and especially you, my web site readers. Then, at around 3pm, I decided, If you're going to run an international music web site, you owe it to your readers to report on things like this. I jumped on my bike (the only way to navigate an event like this) and got down to the Empire-Fulton Ferry Park in the now officially hip-as-Bono neighborhood of DUMBO, just in time to see U2 arrive in style: playing aboard a flat-bed truck as they crossed the Manhattan Bridge.

(It transpired that, never ones to do things by halves, the group had played all the way from midtown Manhattan. Posie leaned out her office window wondering what all the commotion was, heard someone in an Irish accent shout "Hello, New York" and told the person at the window above her, "Well, that sounds like Bono to me." Someone marry that woman!)

U2: First we'll take (the) Manhattan (Bridge).

I didn't arrive in time to snag a free ticket for the actual concert area – they'd all been distributed through MTV by last minute e-mail – but after a brief bike ride up and down the Brooklyn Bridge, I settled in with an extremely polite, well-behaved and generally gratified crowd just across a patch of narrow water from the stage. We couldn't see U2 clearly (where are the giant video screens when you need them), but once the show started, we could hear them perfectly – even above the roar of the TV helicopters. I likened our experience to the summer shows in Prospect Park where picnickers often prefer to set up shop outside the Bandshell rather than deal with the crowds inside, but for one notable difference: the season. Even though it was relatively mild for early winter, we were still down by the water, and a few people, ill-dressed for the long wait and the relatively long show, were forced to give up. Again, I've learned from experience; dressed in gloves and hat, I was more than comfortable. I perched myself on a rock just above the waves gently lapping at the Brooklyn beach, and decided to make the most of listening in as the band took the stage round 4.45pm.

The truck U2 rode in on (looks like the band had switched to a limo at this point...)

The nine-song set opened, predictably, with the new single 'Vertigo,' featuring Bono's classically over-the-top extended call-and-response "yeah yeah yeahs" at conclusion. "Brooklyn, New York, you've just been jammed," he then cried, though the reference surely applied more to the band's impact on the rush hour traffic than any suggestion that this was a strictly impromptu performance. The straightahead rocker 'All Because Of You' then gave way to Atomic Bomb's own back-to-back ballads, each of which necessitated a lengthy introductory explanation from the ever-garrulous Bono. For 'Miracle Drug' he reminded us that "we're just four kids from North Dublin who went to school at a terrible comprehensive" (as opposed to being multi-millionaires who own half of Dublin, individual homes in the South of France and can close down New York City for a day), and 'Sometimes You Can't Make It On Your Own' told us that when his father died, he left a gift: "I've got a voice back I haven't had for years."

You have to love Bono. I mean, you have to love a rock star whose ego is such that he acts like he's the first person on earth to lose his father – and feels compelled to write a song about the experience. (And I'm not being facetious, not really: few of us with lesser egos would ever dream to write such a song. I have no doubt there are millions who will thank Bono for doing so as they cry along in shared understanding - especially as it's the kind of classic rock ballad certain to be released as the album's third single.)

City Of Blinding Lights: Brooklyn Bridge as the show started

...And as it ended. Bono changed the words of 'Beautiful Day' to include the 'Manhattan Skyline.'

As Bono then enthused about the backdrop – and by now, with the sun down and the night lights up, it was indeed quite stunning – I felt certain they would take a break from the new album and dip back one to the song 'New York,' but instead they played the equally appropriate 'City Of Blinding Lights,' featuring a shimmering guitar line from The Edge such as he surely composes in his sleep. How To Dismantle...'s finale 'Original Of The Species' was greeted by such enthusiasm from one lone female that Bono joked to his guitarist "I Think we found who got the CD." (The Edge famously lost an advance copy of the album; miraculously, it did not surface as a bootleg. Few people had heard the new album before today's performance.) There was a brief, half-hearted attempt at 'She's A Mystery,' rapidly concluded by drummer Larry Mullen who seems to serve as the group's quality control chief, before they closed out with rousing renditions of 'Beautiful Day' and 'I Will Follow.' It occurred to me that they've been playing the latter song longer than had The Who been playing 'My Generation' at time of their 1989 reunion, but somehow, U2 keep it simple and inspirational. It remains a great song.

That single aside, I was never a big U2 fan as a youth. I passed up seeing them on their many visits to the Herne Hill Half Moon because they were known for behaving like they were already rock stars. They obviously knew something we didn't, because you can't get much more rock star than playing aboard a truck the whole way down Manhattan before commanding half of the New York Police Department to be your security for a free show under the Brooklyn Bridge. Over the years though, they've proven capable of some remarkable music to make up for the hubris – and as one who thought their last album, 2001's All That You Can't Leave Behind, was possibly their finest, I had no complaint about these 45 minutes of free music. (In the Jamming! Magazine Archives: my two-part interview with U2 from 1984, upon release of The Unforgettable Fire.)

I should note that, among those who snagged free tickets were many who had their kids in tow. Will these nippers, in decades to come, be popping in to the iJamming! Pub to reminisce about their first gig? Let's hope so....

Obviously, it was frustrating not being as close up as I'm used to being. Fortunately, towards the end of the event, I recognized someone working security and he let me through, even got me up on the sound board to take a picture of the band playing on the flat bed truck. In my excitement, I set the camera for black and white resolution, but I think you'll agree I captured the spirit.


I didn't know U2 had a trumpet player, and The Edge seems to have died his hair, but at least Bono and Adam Clayton look much like they always did. In fact, they haven't aged a day, eh?


MONDAY NOVEMBER 22

BEATLEMANIA!

I'm skipping on a proper post today for a few reasons.

1) I want you all to travel over to the Pub and read Chris C's memory of his First Time: The Beatles at the Bradford Gaumont, December 1963. What a way to start your career in pop. Do you remember your first time? Post it in The Pub. Signing up only takes a minute.

2) I'm working on something that Chris C is expecting from me. Chris, we're spending too much time in the Pub.

3) I posted at The Weekend, and I know we get more readers on Week Days (i.e. at Work Days) than on Weekends. This gives you a chance to catch up.

4) I've just realised that, for the first time ever, I started removing the back entries from two weeks ago without archiving them. I seem to be without my Daily Muses from Nov 8-11. That includes my Monday Morning Marathon Memories. Gonna have to see if there's any way I can retrieve them. Oh well. We all live in the moment, don't we?

Have a good one...

2004 MUSINGS
NOV 15-21: Album reviews of Freq Nasty, DFA, The Scumfrog, Plus Gentrified Brooklyn, post-Marathon work-outs, First Gigs....
NOV 8-14: Post-Marathon Musings, Post Election Stress, Songs of Hate, NOV 1-7: The Futureheads live, The Election, Bono Vox, Step On, The Marathon,
OCT 25-31: John Peel tribute, Park Slope update, Expat Commentators for Kerry, The Libertines/Golden Republic/Sondre Lerche/VHS Or Beta/Concretes live
OCT 18-24: R.E.M., Kevin Tihista, Brian Wilson, Atomique. Anglo-American Angle, Jon Stewart,
OCT 11-17: Fiery Furnaces, Green Day, Bowling For Soup, Paul Weller, The Go! Team, Fatboy Slim, New York Wines and Dines, Dick Is A Killer,
OCT 4-10: Best of Best Of New York, Keep iJamming! Thriving, WebFriends, October Hitlist
SEP 26-OCT 3: This Sporting Life Parts 1 & 2 (football and Olympics), Full Court Music Press, Rudi, The Clash, Apocalypse
SEP 19-25: The Zutons/Thrills live, Brian Clough RIP, Iraq, Hunting, Virgin Trains, Punk Voters, Step On Steps Down
SEP 17: The V Festival Review: Pixies, Charlatans, Scissor Sisters, Fountains Of Wayne. Basement Jaxx, Audio Bullys, Freestyler, The Killers, Pink - and camp cameraderie.
SEP 12-16: Johnny Ramone, Village Voice vs. New York Press, Love Parades
SEP 11: Absolute Affirmation: A New York Hitlist.
SEP 3-10: The Futureheads live, The Good News, Step Off, No Sleep Till Brooklyn
AUG 23-SEP 2: No postings: On summer holiday.
AUG 16-22: 33 Notes on 45 Bands: Little Steven's International Underground Garage Festival
AUG 9-15: Step On, The Summer Hitlist
AUG 2-8: Crystal Palace are shirt, Crazy Legs are back, The British are Rapping, Losers Lounge, Step On
JULY 26-AUG 1: Farewell to Orbital, the Nike RunHitWonder, Pere Ubu in the Park, Devo, Dave Wakeling, Berger & Wyse
JULY 19-25: Live reviews: Mission Of Burma/Electric Six/The Fever/Van Hunt/Brazilian Girls/Apollo Heights/L Maestro; Crime Watch, Book Watch, TV Watch, Booze Watch
JULY 12-18: Jeff Mills' Exhibitionist DVD review, Midweek W(h)ines, Los Pleneros de la 21/Kékélé live, The Homosexuals,
JULY 5-11: Nick Hornby's Songbook
JUNE 28-JULY 4: The Streets/Dizzee Rascal/I Am X/Funkstorung live, Wine, Football and festivals,
JUNE 21-27: Lollapalooza, Morrissey, Deadwood, London Calling, Stone Roses, Euro 2004,
JUNE 14-20: Fast Food and Cheap Oil, Party Prospects, More Clash, Radio Indie Pop
JUNE 7-13: MP3s vs AIFF, Step on, June Hitlist, The Clash,
MAY 31-JUNE 6: Benzos/The Hong Kong/Home Video live, Tribute Bands, Lester Bangs, Glad All Over
MAY 24-30: The Clash, Fear Of A Black Planet, Marvin Gaye, Sandy Bull, Richard Pryor, Stoop Sale LPs, Michael Moore, Nat Hentoff
MAY 17-23: 5th Ave Street Fair, James, Surefire/The Go Station live, Crystal Palace
MAY 10-16: Radio 4 live, John Entwistle, Jeff Mills, Wine notes, Joy Division covers
APR 26-MAY 9: Twenty Twos, Morningwood, French Kicks, Ambulance Ltd all live, More Than Nets, Mod, Turning 40
APR 19-25: 5 Boroughs Rock, The Number 3 Bus, Orbital split, MC5 reform
APR 6-19: British Press Cuttings, More Than Nets, Art Rockers and Brit Packers
MAR 29-APRIL 5: The Rapture/BRMC/Stellastarr* live, The Chinese Beatles, Freddie Adu
MAR 22-28: Singapore Sling live, Kerry on a Snowboard, Pricks on Clits, Eddie Izzard, Who's Two
MAR 15-21: TV On The Radio live, Tracking Terror, Bloomberg's Education Bloc, The Homosexuals,
MAR 8-14: The Undertones live, Winemakers Week, Madrid Bombings, Just In Jest
MAR 1-7: Rhone-gazing, Pop Culture Quiz answers, Who's Hindsight, March Hitlist
FEB 16-29: Lad Lit, American Primaries, New York novels, Candi Staton, the Pop Culture Quiz, World Musics In Context
FEB 9-15: Grammy gripes, Spacemen 3, Replacements, Touching The Void, Moon myths, Voice Jazz & Pop Poll
FEB 2-FEB 8: Suicide Girls in the flesh, Johnny Rotten's a Celebrity...So's Jodie Marsh
JAN 26-FEB 1: Starsailor/Stellastarr*/Ambulance live, Tiswas, Wine Watch, Politics Watch
JAN 19-25: Brooklyn Nets? LCD Soundsystem, Iowa Primary, The Melody, TV On The Radio
JAN 12-18: The Unicorns live, New York w(h)ines, Sex In The City, Curb Your Enthusiasm, S.U.V. Safety, Bands Reunited
JAN 5-11: Tony's Top 10s of 2003, Howard Dean and his credits, Mick Middles and Mark E. Smith, Mick Jones and Don Letts,

2003 MUSINGS ARE LISTED HERE
2002 MUSINGS ARE LISTED HERE:


iJamming! Site Copyright Tony Fletcher 2004




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WHAT'S NEW IN iJAMMING!...

JOHN PEEL: A Tribute

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BOOK REVIEW:
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THE MARCH HITLIST:
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Live at Mercury Lounge
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With Joe Strummer
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SUICIDE GIRLS just wanna have fun

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THE BEST OF 2003
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FEATURED WINE REGION:
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From the Jamming! Archives
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FEATURED WINE:
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THE OTHER NEW YORK MARATHON: 10 Live Reviews from the CMJ Music Marathon, October 2003

THE OCTOBER HITLIST:
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NEW YORK W(H)INES:
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DANCING IN THE DARK:
Bruce Springsteen at Shea Stadium

The biggest night out that you'll ever have in." Jockey Slut
"Hedonism will have you gripped from start to finish, guaranteed." International DJ


Tony Fletcher's debut novel HEDONISM is out now. For more information and to read excerpts, click here.

HEDONISM is available mail order in the USA from Barnes&Noble.com. It's available mail order in the UK from amazon.co.uk or musicroom.com.

American residents can also receive signed copies direct from iJamming! for just $20 including shipping and handling. Click on the PayPal button below. Please allow 7-10 days for delivery.

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