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This page last updated
Wed, Dec 17, 2003 8:46 pm

THE JAMMING! MAGAZINE ARCHIVE CONTENTS...

JAMMING!s 1-12:
The covers and their contents

JAMMING!s 13-24:
The covers and their contents

JAMMING!s 25-36:
The covers and their contents

TONY PARSONS on
BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN 1984

THE JAM
Interviewed in 1979

KILLING JOKE
interviewed in 1981

ADAM ANT
Interviewed in 1978

PAUL WELLER
interviewed in 1978

U2 interviewed in 1984.

PAUL WELLER ON POP
from 1982

The Story That Spawned Creation from 1982

ALTERNATIVE TV
interviewed in 1978

RAYMONDE
interviewed in 1985

LIMITED EDITIONS OF JAMMING! MAGAZINE AVAILABLE BY MAIL ORDER. DETAILS

The Story that spawned Creation

I've been trying to figure out how to put up this page without it looking self congratulatory. I don't think I can. So I'll just deal with the facts. Long after I'd forgotten about the contents of the 'Statement' from Jamming! 13 printed below, Alan McGee told me it was the reason he started Creation Records. I remember Alan vividly from his first days in London; he had a cool band called The Laughing Apple, and then a lively fanzine called Communication Blur, and he put on some gigs under the name The Communication Club, for which I'm told Apocalypse played, though I have not a single memory whatsoever of the actual gig. He used to stop by the office when I was running the Jamming! Label and I even remember him suggesting we get together with our Rickenbackers one day. When he started the label, I crucified the first single (The Legend's '73 in '83') in print, after which I figured he hated me and generally kept out his way. I don't remember him ever saying that Jamming! was the inspiration for Creation.

He kept at it though, on several occasions in the mid-nineties when we ran into each other. (Mainly when I was back in London researching the Moon book in '96.) After the third time, I told him to stop telling me and start telling other people. Lo and behold, when Paolo Hewitt's 'Getting High' biography of Oasis came out (though it's now unavailable), there it was, on page 162: "One day McGee is to be found reading a fanzine called Jamming. In it, the editor, Tony Fletcher has written an impassioned article about punk's failure, the betrayal of certain bands of the punk ethos and the subsequent stagnation of the music scene. The article truly fired McGee's imagination. 'It was saying, you've got to get off your arse and how nobody had any morals or beliefs anymore. Everything he said was right.'"

I was flattered. Still am, in fact. Then shortly after the Oasis book came out, David Cavanagh called me from London; he was writing the 'official' story of Creation Records and McGee had told him about the article and how it had inspired him. Cavanagh started grilling me about its naive contents without having seen it, so I sent him a copy and in the process finally got round to reading it again after, literally, about 10-15 years. Well, it was naive. Embarrassingly so now I look it scanned and about to hit the web. But when you're 18 you really do think you can take on the world and change it. It's the beauty of youth. This feeling of total certainty borders on megalomania but without it we'd never risk creating the new art that comes with being fearless - or marvel at young sportsmen similarly unwilling to countenance defeat.

Cavanagh's book 'The Creation Records Story: My Magpie Eyes are Hungry for the Prize' came out a month or so ago and my same editorial is again credited as being pivotal, across several pages in fact. An excerpt: "In his summer issue of 1982, Fletcher wrote an editorial which railed at the state of post-new Romantic pop music. He concluded by urging his readers to get up off their backsides, remember punk and do something. McGee reread the article many times. " Cavanagh then dissects the Statement almost word for word, concluding "Fletcher also made the point that once everyone got motivated, the new uprising - whatever it might look or sound like - would not be as major label-controlled as punk had been. There was a solid indie structure in place, he insisted, which could exclude the majors from the party. This, more than anything, made McGee sit up and take notice. . .?McGee had never been so moved by a piece of writing."

What can I say? Except that again, I'm flattered. And I'm still waiting for the major label stranglehold to be broken and still writing about that possibility! (Oh, and that my crucifixion of that first Creation single was apparently the only press it got, "and deservedly so," says a recalcitrant McGee in the book of its drubbing. "And it registered.") It has been my intention to use the web site to post archive material such as the unedited interviews, but with publication of the Creation book (and the closing of that label) I figure this should go up first. And, I've got to admit, it's a lot easier scanning in one page from a magazine than retyping a three hour Paul McCartney interview. I don't defend anything I wrote here when I was 18. But I don't withdraw any of it either. It is what it was. And if it inspired any one to go for it in any way, shape or form, then it did its job.

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