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Sun, Jul 24, 2005 12:20

THE JAMMING! MAGAZINE ARCHIVE CONTENTS...

JAMMING!s 1-12:
The covers and their contents

JAMMING!s 13-24:
The covers and their contents

JAMMING!s 25-36:
The covers and their contents

TONY PARSONS on
BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN 1984

THE JAM
Interviewed in 1979

KILLING JOKE
interviewed in 1981

ADAM ANT
Interviewed in 1978

PAUL WELLER
interviewed in 1978

U2 interviewed in 1984.

PAUL WELLER ON POP
from 1982

The Story That Spawned Creation from 1982

ALTERNATIVE TV
interviewed in 1978

RAYMONDE
interviewed in 1985

LIMITED EDITIONS OF JAMMING! MAGAZINE AVAILABLE BY MAIL ORDER. DETAILS

from the jamming! archives:
KILLING JOKE
interviewed in 1981
by Anthony Blampied & Tony Fletcher

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT HERE

ANTHONY BLAMPIED REMEMBERS:

April 1981. Half a lifetime ago, I'm awoken by a knock at the door of my north London bedsit... "Telephone!" Shivering on the landing, I find that it's Tony calling with concern over our planned rendezvous for later that day with Killing Joke. Sleepy and bewildered, I ask what the problem is. "You must be the only person in the country not to know!" he exclaims. "The whole of Brixton went up last night."

[Within the past month I'd gone from being a regular reader of Jamming! to one of its photographers, inspired by my then-hero Anton Corbijn of the NME – and despite my woefully inadequate equipment of an Olympus Trip automatic camera and a borrowed flashgun.]

We decide to brave it, and make the trek over to deepest Notting Hill, where the following side-splitting encounter took place. Did it seem so funny at the time? Or was the (killing) joke on us? In a series of stoned rants that combine Mick & Keef petulance with Derek & Clive levels of obscenity, Jaz and Youth hold forth on the riots, fame, nuclear war, America, fanzines vs. the weeklies... all punctuated with more swearing than I would have believed possible.

Anthony Blampied, December 2002


TONY FLETCHER REMEMBERS:

April 1981... They were stark, dark, minimal, confrontational, loud and not a little violent. And that was just their reputation as interviewees! But there was something truly fascinating about Killing Joke's apocalyptic vision, and their arrival on the London scene upon the dawn of the eighties was impossible to ignore: the songs 'Wardance,' 'Requiem' and 'Change', all from their debut 1981 album, resonated with the frightening mood of the time. Thanks to our friendship with one of bassist Youth's schoolfriends, Guy Pratt (who at the time played in mod revivalists Speedball but went on to replace Roger Waters in the touring Pink Floyd), Jamming! was able to arrange an interview with Youth and Killing Joke frontman Jaz Coleman. Clearly not concerned with the rigmaroles of the working week, they invited us to see them on a Sunday. The night before, Brixton went up in riotous flames following one police provocation of the local West Indian community too many. Killing Joke lived in Ladbroke Grove, itself the other main West Indian community in London, and the scene of many a violent face-off with the police at the annual Notting Hill carnival.

My journey into London from the suburbs of south London necessitated going through Brixton, but given that I had taken that route every day for five years to my secondary school in Kennington, every night I went into town for gigs, and that my band rehearsed on the Brixton 'front line', Railton Road, I wasn't going to let the small matter of a community in armed confrontation with the police stop me making the interview! And it didn't. On the journey home later that day, tape recorder still in my bag, I navigated my way from experience around the various police roadblocks into the back streets of Brixton and saw, up close and personal, violent scenes the likes of which I have never witnessed in America in fifteen years of living here. A memorable day.

Because of the tension in the air that day, we were invited to conclude the interview at a later date – which we did. The tension in Brixton, meanwhile, spread to other cities, and the summer of 1981 is remembered for almost every British urban area having a violent uprising the same week as the Specials 'Ghost Town' went to number 1. Brixton went up in smoke again that July, and I went to see The Jam play on the other side of London; the experience didn't resonate in the same way as did the Killing Joke interview.

A footnote to all this. I would not have imagined interacting with Killing Joke much over subsequent years: for all that I hung out at Rough Trade and Better Badges off the Portobello Road, I never much considered myself part of the Notting Hill set, where there was too much dope smoking and other dubious dealings for my liking. But a decade later, in New York City, running the Communion night, Killing Joke seemed to be constantly in my life. Their whole 1980s catalogue was perennially popular, and while they were too big to play our own venue, we threw an album release party for them.

At that point it seemed as if all the band was living in America. Certainly guitarist Geordie and bassist Raven had made New York their home; they each played in the Killing Joke offspring, Murder Inc., led by former Killing Joke drummer and Chicago-based Invisible Records entrepreneur Martyn Atkins, with whom I became quite friendly. I still occasionally see Geordie around; contrary to the band's early confrontational image, he turned out to be the loveliest person.

Youth, meanwhile, who cultivated a distanced Sid Vicious-like demeanour in those early Joke days, had long left the band. He formed the more radio friendly, though ultimately less important, Brilliant with Jimmy Cauty; along with former Joke roadie Alex Paterson, both men were then changed by early exposure to the British rave scene. Cauty and Paterson formed ambient pioneers The Orb, and Youth became the movement's studio guru, going on to become one of the most celebrated producers of the 1990s: his credits are all over records by The Verve, Crowded House, James, System 7, several hundred remixes, and even a one-off dance album with Paul McCartney under the name The Fireman.

And as for Jaz, the man with the particularly maniacal eyes and obsessed voice, he turned out to be every bit the mad scientist we suspected. After initially breaking up the band by heading off to Iceland (long before it was known for a music scene), he resurfaced as a classical composer, working with Ann Dudley, then with Youth on various Symphonic Arrangements of Classic Rock bands, teamed up again with the Joke several times and finally retired to New Zealand. Killing Joke's music – especially its early 1980s recordings – has endured well over the years; the album Wilful Days provides plenty proof of this. But as Anthony writes in his introduction, our interview experience back in April 1981 could hardly have cooked up more clichés if we'd fictionalized the interview as a caricature. Wilful Days? Yes. Naive? That too. Did we get the Joke? Not at the time. But I think we do now.

TONY FLETCHER, MARCH 2003

The Killing Joke interview as it originally appeared in Jamming! 12. Click on a thumbnail for the full-size image. Read the full transcript here

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