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What's new in iJamming!...
Sun, Mar 3, 2002
ECHO & THE BUNNYMEN: "Flowers is Echo & The Bunnymen's finest hour since Ocean Rain."
HEDONISM:
An intrigue of early 90s New York nightlife.
NEW CHAPTER now online
From the Jamming! Archives:
U2 interviewed in 1984.
"It's not U2 that's creating this great art. . .There's something that works through us to create in this way."
MUSING ON A SEPTEMBER MOURNING
PART1:
My immediate reaction to September 11
PART 2: Messages from friends & family overseas
PART 3: Observations & quotes from others.
PART 4: LINKS
PART 5: COPING - 2 weeks later
iJamming! Wino/Muso:
JOHN ACQUAVIVA
"New world wines are just too techno for me."
Featured albums
(Hub, Slumber Party, DJ Harry, Spearhead, The Who tribute
)
Albums that sound different since September 11
(Charlatans UK, Arabian Travels, Cafe del Mar, Sugarcult)
Featured wine region 3:
SOUTHERN RHÔNE WHITES
Featured wine region 4:
SOUTHERN RHÔNE ROSÉS
iJamming! interview:
Jesse Hartman, aka LAPTOP
"Every New York band knows the meaning of failure"
MIX Albums:
Who, what and why you should bother (DB, Spooky, Jody, RSW, Bad Boy Bill)
FEATURED Wines (Langlois Cremant de Loire, Honig Sauvignon Blanc, Campbell's Muscat, Brumont Gros Manseng, Dr Frank Gewürtztraminer, Daubree CoteRotie, Dry Creek Chenin Blanc, Mas Saint Laurent Picpoul, Quivira Dry Creek)
The iJAMMING! interview: DAVID SYLVIAN
"I don't think people realize that life can become so exciting and interesting that it can draw you away for long periods of time from creating music - & why not?"
From the Keith Moon archives:
the JEFF BECK interview .
From Homework to the Disco:
DAFT PUNK
grows up and dumbs down
The iJAMMING! chat:
MARK PERRY

"If I was asked why Sniffin' Glue was so important, it was the way we conducted ourselves, the style of it, just the attitude. It had attitude in abundance didn't it?"
The Return of Shoegazing:
DOVES take New York by swarm
Forgotten Classics:
THE CHILLS: Brave Words
THE iJAMMING! Book Review:
SNIFFIN' GLUE: The Essential Punk Accessory
Musing with SALLY TAYLOR:
"I'm not interested in what the major labels have to offer."
From the JAMMING! archives: PAUL WELLER ON POP
Featured wine region 2:
CÔTES DU RHÔNE VILLAGES
From the JAMMING! archives: ALTERNATIVE TV
interviewed in 1978
TRAVIS.
Fran Healy explains why "you cannot own a song." (And why Liam Gallagher "is going to turn into a really great songwriter.")
Featured Artist Web Site:
LLOYD COLE
From the JAMMING! archives: The Story That Spawned Creation
Featured vine:
VIOGNIER:
Finally, a worthy rival to Chardonnay.
The iJAMMING! interview:
BOY GEORGE.
"Once you've had your go, what-ever it may be, they want you to piss off, and they can't bear it if you come back, they can't bear it."
SUPERDRAG
They love rock'n'roll but they don't want to deal with the hassle
From the JAMMING! archives: RAYMONDE in 1985
The full iJamming! Contents
iJAMMING! album reviews
IN GENERAL, I ENJOY MUCH MORE OF THE MUSIC I GET SENT THAN I EVER GET THE CHANCE TO WRITE ABOUT. After all, an album needs to fulfill all sorts of criteria to justify magazine/newspaper space - relevance, availability, commerciality - and a lot of the cult/underground/new music I hear just doesn't pass those tests. Doesn't mean that some of it isn't great though. (It also doesn't mean that some of it isn't terrible, too, of course. ) One advantage of the web site is that I can - occasionally, sporadically, or in one fell swoop - offer up a few sentences on intriguing new releases before they get put away and passed over. This is not to make more work for myself or dish out favors, but if I've already listened something a few times, feel I have something to say and that others may have reason to enjoy, then why not? Back in December 2000, I put up an album review a day while clearing the decks during the end-of-year lull; here in March 2001 I've put up a few more as I've realised they're not going to get space elsewhere; for the fun of it, there are wine recommendations to accompany them. (There's a separate round-up mix CDs.)
September 2001: another batch up-loaded in one go.
WHO
LiLiPUT
LiLiPUT
KILL ROCK STARS (DOUBLE CD)

WHAT:
Exciting, experimental vibrant, and irreverent post-punk rock.

WHY
Liliput originally went by the name Kleenex, until a certain multi-national hanky conglomerate (t)issued a cease and desist - had released. I remember Kleenex from back in the day, but I don't remember early tracks such as 'Hedi's Head,' 'Madness' and 'Nice' sounding this good - like, and arguably better than, the Slits or the Raincoats. When Kleenex changed name to Liliput in 1980, and added a saxophonist, the sound really came together. As lyrics switch from English to German, often in the same song, you can hear the adolescent shrill of X-Ray Spex, the post-punk experimentation of Essential Logic, the gleefulness of Delta 5 and the scratchy funk of the Au Pairs. You also discover the blueprint for Shonen Knife, Bis, and all manner of riot grrrrl groups who have come and gone over the years. Once post punk played out, the 5-piece shrunk to a trio, and a second CD collects the more avant-garde, experimental, but still intriguing pieces from the early 80s. 46 tracks is a lot to take in one go, but next time someone tries to tell me that yeah, the post-punk period was all good fun, but the music didn't stand the test of time, I'll play them snippets from this and rest my case.
PRIME CUTS
The delightful 'Hitch Hike' delivers its verses in 5/4 time signature and its choruses in 2/4. 'DC10' celebrates the disaster-proned airplane. 'Wig Wam' has glorious "whoa-whoas" in the background. I could go on. . .
WINE?
Something this spiky, angular, sharp, vivacious and heady deserves wine to match. It's not Swiss, but Seghisio's Zinfandel will do perfectly.
WHO
HONEYDOGS
HERE'S LUCK
PALM PICTURES

WHAT:
Authenticity, sincerity - and melody.

WHY
The Honeydogs' tribulations are all-too-familiar: indie albums in 1995 and 1996 gain acclaim, band signs to boutique imprint (Debris) of major label (Mercury), records and releases critically-acclaimed but commercially disliked album in 1997, boutique imprint dissolves, major label assures band of ongoing relationship, sends group back into the studio, new album is recorded in 1998, major label gets swallowed up by even bigger major label (Seagrams), band is dropped. Even a new home at Chris Blackwell's Palm Pictures has not been without problems: Palm sent advances out last summer then put the release back to January. Oh dear. And to think that the group wrote and recorded 'Sour Grapes' - with the lyrics "it's easy to pray, it's the waiting that kills you, it's hard to say, I think we're going down soon" - while still on Mercury! Much of this indefatigable Minneapolis band's other songwriting recalls late sixties Beatles - an admirable, but somewhat unattainable sound for mere mortals to attempt. Still, string sections resonate psychedelically on 'Wilson Boulevard,' the ghost of John Lennon is called on for 'Pins in Dolls,' while 'Freakshow' and 'Red Dye #40' take interesting lyrical tangents. Occasionally inconsistent, but when it's very good, it gives Semisonic a run for their money.
PRIME CUTS
'Sour Grapes' and 'Losing Transmission' (with lyrical radio references as programmers so love) are the power-pop sing-alongs.
WINE? Something traditional, reliable, fresh yet familiar - and organic. Honig's Sauvignon Blanc.
WHO
DAVID ABIR: MOVEMENT A, STUDY 33
ASHLEY WALES: LANDSCAPE
SULPHUR/BEGGARS BANQUET

WHAT:
Ambient/classical composers share a showcase

WHY
The growth of electronic music in the nineties has seen a renewed interest in classical compositions, thanks to the likes of Orbital's mini-symphonies, William Orbit's reworking of adagios, and ambient music's ongoing development of a full century of experimentation. The Sulphur label dives further into this pool with its Meld Series, aiming to "explore the union of one artist with another, breaking the mould, dissolving expectations." Its third release features two artists/recordings that celebrate serenity. David Abir's 'Movement A' has been electronically recorded and incorporates lots of gently oscillating synth sounds, but has 'cello and treated vocal in there as well. Pulsating quietly for a full 23 minutes, it makes even early Orb look aggressive, but it's gorgeous all the same, a lovely late night musical wind down. Ashley Wales was part of Spring Heel Jack and Shockheaded Peters; his 'Landscape' is shorter, with a gentle piano chord motif underscoring the most subtle of changes as synthetic overdubs waft gently around the ether. It's angling for a supporting role in a Merchant-Ivory soundtrack. This is ambient as modern music gets, but it's charming all the same.
PRIME CUTS
Um, there's only two.
WINE? Late night, relaxing, contemplative music deserves late night, contemplative, relaxing wine. An Amarone, for sure. We even have one you can afford.
WHO
GWENMARS
DRIVING A MILLION
SEE THRU BROADCASTING

WHAT:
Sixties psychedelia, new wave power pop and mid-eighties alterno-rock.

WHY
Anyone lamenting the Psychedelic Furs' absence should be readily assuaged by this LA band's third album (the other two, on defunct Hollywood, are out of print). Mike Thrasher (real name) has a voice that's a near carbon copy of Richard Butler's, and the arrangements aren't that far off either. If some songs ('Radio Gun,' 'The Rain') are so blatantly Furs-like that they could be released under that name and no one would be any the wiser, then others like 'Venus,' 'Come Here' and 'Electro' (with its big fuzz guitars) are just great hard-rockers regardless of influence. They deliver live too. Shame about the name. Would Supergrass have got so far if they'd been called Gwenmars?
PRIME CUTS
'She Hung The Moon' has the acoustic guitars and strings that were the cornerstone of my all-time favorite album Ocean Rain.
WINE? A Californian power trio of European influence suggests a wine to match: Vinum Cellar's Pointe Blanc.
WHO
HENRY ROLLINS
A ROLLINS IN THE WRY
2.13.61

WHAT:
Renaissance man and punk rock pin-up in spoken word foray

WHY
I love Henry Rollins - as long as he's not playing music. I particularly like him in stand-up format: he's a raconteur who combines self-deprecating humor with cultural foresight. A Rollins in the Wry gathers material from an LA residency he did two years ago, most of which can be filed under 'Potential Mid-Life Crisis.' His increasing ability to laugh at himself is good news for those who would paint him as dour; at times, usually when discussing sex, he even sounds like the politically incorrect Joe Rogan. That one of these sets took place the day of the Colombine High School massacre affords him the opportunity to offer some prescient words about parenting - and punk rock.
PRIME CUTS
'Clintonese' pokes fun at a certain ex-President, 'The United Colors of West LA' at a certain sexual community in his home town. But 'Future Parents' and 'Maturity' give it all meaning.
WINE? Let's see. Masculine and wrestling with maturity, a tough exterior but sensitive on the inside. Mature Cabernet - if you can afford it. Rasteau if you can't.
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iJamming! Site Copyright Tony Fletcher 2001.