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What's new in iJamming!...
Tue, Oct 23, 2001
ECHO & THE BUNNYMEN: "Flowers is Echo & The Bunnymen's finest hour since Ocean Rain."
HEDONISM:
An intrigue of early 90s New York nightlife.
NEW CHAPTER now online
From the Jamming! Archives:
U2 interviewed in 1984.
"It's not U2 that's creating this great art. . .There's something that works through us to create in this way."
MUSING ON A SEPTEMBER MOURNING
PART1:
My immediate reaction to September 11
PART 2: Messages from friends & family overseas
PART 3: Observations & quotes from others.
PART 4: LINKS
PART 5: COPING - 2 weeks later
iJamming! Wino/Muso:
JOHN ACQUAVIVA
"New world wines are just too techno for me."
Featured albums
(Hub, Slumber Party, DJ Harry, Spearhead, The Who tribute
)
Albums that sound different since September 11
(Charlatans UK, Arabian Travels, Cafe del Mar, Sugarcult)
Featured wine region 3:
SOUTHERN RHÔNE WHITES
Featured wine region 4:
SOUTHERN RHÔNE ROSÉS
iJamming! interview:
Jesse Hartman, aka LAPTOP
"Every New York band knows the meaning of failure"
MIX Albums:
Who, what and why you should bother (DB, Spooky, Jody, RSW, Bad Boy Bill)
FEATURED Wines (Langlois Cremant de Loire, Honig Sauvignon Blanc, Campbell's Muscat, Brumont Gros Manseng, Dr Frank Gewürtztraminer, Daubree CoteRotie, Dry Creek Chenin Blanc, Mas Saint Laurent Picpoul, Quivira Dry Creek)
The iJAMMING! interview: DAVID SYLVIAN
"I don't think people realize that life can become so exciting and interesting that it can draw you away for long periods of time from creating music - & why not?"
From the Keith Moon archives:
the JEFF BECK interview .
From Homework to the Disco:
DAFT PUNK
grows up and dumbs down
The iJAMMING! chat:
MARK PERRY

"If I was asked why Sniffin' Glue was so important, it was the way we conducted ourselves, the style of it, just the attitude. It had attitude in abundance didn't it?"
The Return of Shoegazing:
DOVES take New York by swarm
Forgotten Classics:
THE CHILLS: Brave Words
THE iJAMMING! Book Review:
SNIFFIN' GLUE: The Essential Punk Accessory
Musing with SALLY TAYLOR:
"I'm not interested in what the major labels have to offer."
From the JAMMING! archives: PAUL WELLER ON POP
Featured wine region 2:
CÔTES DU RHÔNE VILLAGES
From the JAMMING! archives: ALTERNATIVE TV
interviewed in 1978
TRAVIS.
Fran Healy explains why "you cannot own a song." (And why Liam Gallagher "is going to turn into a really great songwriter.")
Featured Artist Web Site:
LLOYD COLE
From the JAMMING! archives: The Story That Spawned Creation
Featured vine:
VIOGNIER:
Finally, a worthy rival to Chardonnay.
The iJAMMING! interview:
BOY GEORGE.
"Once you've had your go, what-ever it may be, they want you to piss off, and they can't bear it if you come back, they can't bear it."
SUPERDRAG
They love rock'n'roll but they don't want to deal with the hassle
From the JAMMING! archives: RAYMONDE in 1985
The full iJamming! Contents
MIX CDs:
WHO, WHAT AND
WHY YOU SHOULD BOTHER
What I like about mix CDs is how they capture the fragmented, ephemeral nature of the music they compile. Dance music typically has a lot less to do with artist albums than single moments, and those moments are often best experienced in the clubs, when the DJ drops the needle on something special - and if he or she is up to the task, mixes it (in and out) in unexpected, original and memorable fashion. Buying a mix CD can be like buying a souvenir of that great club experience, while supporting the tactics/techniques/talent of a great DJ. Given how hard it is to obtain much of the music heard in clubs, and how much harder it is still to turn that music into a perfectly mixed compilation on your own, why not have the individual tracks made available as part of an overall piece, compiled by the very people who make the tracks popular in the first place?

What I don't like about mix CDs is their often generic nature which renders the music pure wallpaper fodder. As the markeptlace become saturated with the format, too many average DJs fill their allotted hour with rote segues of unspectacular tracks (the hits are harder to license that the bigger franchises make it look) and the music blends into the background. Cynics will say that all it's good for in the first place, but the mix CD should keep the listener on his or her toes, constantly surprise and experiment. On the other end of the spectrum, too may star packages arrive these days front-loaded with the same hits by the same names, their track lists chosen by the label rather than the DJ, the mix compiled digitally in a studio from master tapes, rather than on the decks. You won't read about any of these travesties on this page. Instead, from the dozens upon dozens of CDs to have come my way over recent months, I've picked out five that I think reflect best upon their genre, their compiler, and the format in general. I could have made it ten; in a month or two, I may well have done.

TONY FLETCHER, Mar 2001
WHO
LITTLE LOUIE VEGA & ERICK MORILLO
HOUSE NATION AMERICA
Ministry of Sound/Ultra

WHAT:
New York House - old school and new school

TEMPOS
LLV: 124-130/EM: 131-134

WHY YOU SHOULD BOTHER
That it should take a London record label to partner such influential NY DJs says much about the short play the American house scene gets in its home territory. Vega has been a Master At Work for well over a decade, favoring deep house with Latin percussion flourishes as acts like Africanism, Latina Cafe and Aztec Mystik might suggest. Morillo is younger, sexier, and more European; his CD showcases the future disco of his Subliminal label, is heavy on the tech-house, and is as clever as it is funky. Simultaneously commercial and credible - every DJ's dream combo - it's one of the best party mixes of recent years.
BEST MIXES
Morillo is at full throttle within ten minutes: over the track 'Invaders' by Hatiras, he mixes in acapella versions of Simon's MLK-sampling 'Free at Last' (a track you can hear on several other CDs right now, Morillo is the only one I know who works with the a capella), AND Ron Carroll's house preach 'The Sermon.' The mix sounds like it's live too. Genius.
WINE? Credible and commercial, suave, sophisticated, sexy and a little funky, the pride of New York deserves wine to match! Try the cabernet franc from Schneider on Long Island.
WHO
JACK DANGERS
HELLO FRIENDS
Shadow

WHAT:
"Jack Dangers plays w the records of Tino Corp."

TEMPOS
85-135

WHY YOU SHOULD BOTHER
When Meat Beat Manifesto lost its second deal in as many albums, Jack Dangers went back underground, launching the 'Tino Breaks' label with Ben Stokes and Mike Powell. They've released five volumes of typically hard-hitting, MBM-like, DJ-tool beats so far, but this is the first time they've been a) mixed together and b) promoted as a consumer release. It's dub, it's Latino, it's breakbeat, it's still a little industrial, it's occasionally jungle and it's all seriously avant-garde. Made using three turntables, a CD player and a couple of effects, it's like Meat Beat without the Manifesto. And that's a good thing.
BEST MIXES
'Fourteen separate songs are listened in sequential order, but many of the same riffs appear througout, even as the tempo ebbs and flows: the chop-up drum lesson 'Exercise For the Left Hand'; Tino's "hello friends" welcome in various languages, and a couple of ragga chants, and so on. The effect is intentional: this feels like one piece of music even as it showcases a wide variety.
WINE? An eccentric, idiosyncratic quality Californian product of European origins deserves wine to match. Try the Pointe Blanc from Vinum.
WHO
MR C
SUBTERRAIN
The End/Engine

WHAT:
"Mr C presents Subterrain 100% Unreleased."

TEMPOS
132-136

WHY YOU SHOULD BOTHER
The likes of Dave Angel, Terry Francis and Derrick Carter recorded their tracks especially for this project, as tribute to the tech-house Subterrain night Mr C hosts at his own club The End in London. As if that wasn't credibility enough, Mr C then pressed up dubplates and mixed the album live, on vinyl - not that you can tell, so perfect are his turntable skills. Then he broke the album back up into a series of commercial 12" Eps for the vinyl enthusiasts, all the while promoting his club night, his label and his DJ bankability. That's what I call multi-tasking.
BEST MIXES
Not too much flashiness: given that many haven't been heard before, each track gets its own space to breathe. But personal faves are 'Kipping' by End partners Layo & Bushwacka!, and the daft but funky 'Polyphonic Destruction' by Kosmic Messenger, aka Stacey Pullen.
WINE? Techno is an insider's music, and the End is a cult club that is yet open-armed about newcomers. Passionate fans of Mourvedre will appreciate such a combination. Try the exceptional Pic St Loup winery Chateau La Roque's Cuvee Vieilles Vignes.
WHO
BEN WATT & JAY HANNAN
LAZY DOG
Astralwerks

WHAT:
"Deep house music"

TEMPOS
124-127

WHY YOU SHOULD BOTHER
Ben Watt's journey from old fashioned acoustic singer-songwriter to drum and bass/deep house DJ/producer has been as effortless as it has been extreme. He never changed horses in mid race, so much as changed the horse's diet and training as well as his own tactics, somehow staying upright in the saddle while racing to the front of the pack. Something to be admired more than imitated. His CD is a breeze through jazzy house arrangements of a fixed tempo with lots of vocals. Partner Jay Hannan - the two of them DJ the Lazy Dog Sunday afternoon parties in London - delivers an equally delightful set. If you can't make it to the party, put it on a Sunday spring afternoon at home; it will likely have the same effect.
BEST MIXES
'Tracey in My Room,' a mix that first saw light of day on this CD, is now out as a single in its own right, credited to EBTG vs Soul Vision. That's easier than listing the individual elements: Tracey Thorn's acapella vocal of the EBTG song 'Wrong' (composed with Watt) over the Soul Vision remix of 'Come Into My Room' by Sandy Rivera featuring LT Brown. But that's the way dance works: record a song, get a guest vocalist, do a remix, place another vocal from a different record over and under it, try it in the clubs, press up the bootleg mixes, releae it and start the cycle all over again.
WINE? The perfect Sunday brunch house companion merits a Sunday bubbly for simosas/buck's fizz or sumptious quaffing. Try the Latin-tinged percussive hit from Chandon's Argentinian arm, its non-vintage Brut fresco .
WHO
AFRIKA BAMBAATAA
REWIND
Mixer/DMC

WHAT:
"Electro funk breakdown"

TEMPOS
113-130

WHY YOU SHOULD BOTHER
You don't need a degree in hip hop to know that Afrika Bambaataa was there at the start with his Zulu Nation. You may not need to have kept up with the genre to have heard that he is still out there DJing. But you might be real surprised to hear just how hip his hip-hop sounds: Rewind is the archetypal "journey through sound," starting with an "old school anthem" ('Cinder Blocks' by Sharaz) , taking in Germanic electro, sparse NY house and and ending with pure big beat (Ceasefire's 'Evel Knievel' on Wall of Sound.) What will shock you is that all the tracks are from the late nineties. That's some seriously up-to-date retro.
BEST MIXES
DJ Boo's superb electro breaks take on Gary Glitter's 'Rock and Roll Part 2' is inspired, for sure. But pride of place goes to Westbam initating Kraftwerk (Takbam's 'Elektronische Tanzmusik') interspersed with an underground version of 'Who Let The Dawgs Out.' It's the same format that made 'Planet Rock' such a groundbreaker back in the day, but hey, it still works.
WINE? A new release that has all the hallmarks of maturity, from a reliable produce using the expected wide range of ingedients, with plenty of kick, and not a little funk. It's got to be Domaine La Monardiere's exceptional Vin de Pays de Vaucluse.
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iJamming! Site Copyright Tony Fletcher 2001.