Posts

All Hopped Up and Ready To Review


“Fletcher’s fascinating and fulsome study of half a century in the life of a vast metropolis is as thrillingly head-spinning as the city itself.” Record Collector, UK

“The joy here is the manner in which Fletcher unites everything into one vibrantly flowing discourse that affords equal respect for all genres, cultures and artists.” Metro, UK

stickyHGWsm

“Fletcher’s narrative hurtles along like a high-speed cab ride down Broadway. He offers just the right amount of detail, not only about the music but also the clubs, record stores, promoters and hanger-on.” Mojo Magazine

“Covers a dazzling array of eras and genres – and expertly traces the lines between them – offering an excellent potted history of a genuine musical melting pot. An impressive feat.” Q Magazine

stickylksm

“In his richly detailed study of 50 years of the city’s most important music history, music journalist Fletcher vividly recreates the birth and evolution of jazz, folk, pop, punk and hip-hop as the strains of these musical styles emerged from the urban cacophony of New York… Fletcher’s terrific music history captures the teeming life of New York’s thriving music scene.” – Publisher’s Weekly.

<p>   </p>

“Fletcher’s commentary melds very different cultures to shows interrelationships and how new genres built upon the foundations of predecessors. This makes for an ambitious agenda whose demands Fletcher meets magnificently. Anyone interested in popular music and the rich cultural heritage of New York—indeed, of all of the U.S.—should read this book.” – Booklist.

stickypbsm

“It’s enough that Tony Fletcher’s new history of a city’s effects on pop culture over a 50 year period, All Hopped Up And Ready To Go: Music from the Streets of New York 1927-77, has an encyclopedic heft to it, pulling together a wealth of material not usually found together in such detail. But it also has enough descriptive lyricism to send one racing to listen to all the music it describes, and revisit the city streets, from the Bronx out to Rockaway Beach, from which those tunes have emanated.” – Woodstock Times

stickymssmall

“Fletcher provides compelling and convincing evidence on why New York and its unique cultural mix were essential to all of these scenes. He studies in detail how music that developed on the streets became important commercial genres and examines the intersections of all the styles over the 50-year period he discusses.” – Library Journal.

stickytrsmall

“Fletcher… is that rare music scholar whose purview extends beyond the beat. In chronicling the birth of doo-wop, Afro-Cuban jazz, folk-rock, punk, disco, and hip-hop, Fletcher examines developments through a variety of prisms: sociological, ethnic, cultural, financial, religious, geographical—even pharmacological. Fletcher’s multi-faceted command of his material recalls Ann Douglas’s towering Terrible Honesty: Mongrel Manhattan in the 1920s.” – Chronogram, New York

stickysrsm


“All Hopped Up” is not just about music. It’s about who makes the music, where the music is made, and how they relate to one another. It’s like a book version of a Music Genome Project for NYC musicians, with artists surrounded by neighborhoods, enclosed by genre-related circles, which intertwine with other circles that enclose other neighborhoods and individual artists. Thus it is possible to get from Leadbelly to The Chantels in a mere six degrees of separation.” – Metro Spirit, Atlanta

stickybhsm

“Fletcher provides the best account of the evolution of downtown punk I’ve ever read.  He traces not only the familiar Warhol-Max’s Kansas City-Velvet Underground connections, but also the influences flowing from street musicians and activists scarcely mentioned in most histories – The Fugs, David Peel, The Holy Modal Rounders.  And the blow-by-blow account of the explosion of talent at CBGBs is surely definitive.  It’s almost matched by his detailed scrutiny of the birth of disco.” Pink Pig NYC


Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Archives

Calendar of posts

December 2016
M T W T F S S
« Dec    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031